China steps up drone race with stealth aircraft

The CH-7, with a model on display above, can fly at more than 800 kilometers per hour and at an altitude of 13,000 meters. (AFP)
Updated 09 November 2018

China steps up drone race with stealth aircraft

  • The CH-7 — a charcoal-grey UAV unveiled at the air show — is the length of a tennis court with a 22-meter wingspan
  • China has exported its armed UAVs to countries in Asia, Africa and the Middle East

ZHUHAI, China: China is unleashing stealth drones and pilotless aircraft fitted with AK-47 rifles onto world markets, racing to catch up to US technology and adding to a fleet that has already seen combat action in the Middle East.
Combat drones were among the jet fighters, missiles and other military hardware shown off this week at Airshow China, the country’s biggest aerospace industry exhibition.
A delta-winged stealth drone received much attention, highlighting China’s growing production of sophisticated unmanned aerial vehicles seeking to compete with the US military’s massive fleet.
The CH-7 — a charcoal-grey UAV unveiled at the air show — is the length of a tennis court with a 22-meter wingspan. It can fly at more than 800 kilometers per hour and at an altitude of 13,000 meters (42,650 feet).
“We are convinced that with this product clients will quickly contact us,” said Shi Wen, chief engineer of the Caihong (Rainbow) series drones at state-owned China Aerospace Science and Technology Corp. (CASC).
The CH-7’s maiden flight is slated for late next year.
CASC has clients in around 10 countries, Shi said, while declining to name them.
“Some things remain sensitive,” he said.
China’s drones are now flying in the Middle East, as Beijing has fewer qualms than the United States when it comes to selling its military UAVs to other nations.
The Iraqi army has used CASC’s CH-4 drone to conduct at least 260 strikes against the Daesh group, Chinese media reported earlier this year.
In Yemen, where a civil war has sparked what the UN calls the world’s worst humanitarian crisis, the United Arab Emirates military has reportedly targeted a Shiite rebel chief with a Chinese-made drone.
“The Chinese have produced an enormous range of drones, and this seems to be an area that they expect to make great progress,” said Steve Tsang, director of the China Institute at the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS) in London.
“The export and deployment of them should enable them to improve on design as they get tested in a real combat environment,” Tsang said.
The United States has plenty of lethal drones, but it has had restrictions on exporting them out of concern that the technology could be copied or used against its own troops.
Some of those restrictions were lifted in April for US allies, with President Donald Trump’s administration citing competition from Chinese “knockoffs,” but even a solid ally such as Jordan has not been able to buy US drones.
The US rules gave Beijing the opportunity to fill the void and sell its drones to other countries, but China’s “competitive” prices also helped, said James Char, an expert on the Chinese military at Singapore’s Nanyang Technological University.
China has exported its armed UAVs to countries in Asia, Africa and the Middle East, Char said.
At the Zhuhai air show, Chinese drone makers are rubbing their hands at the business opportunities.
“Security is a real problem in the Middle East. There’s a real need for military drones over there,” said Wu Xiaozhen, overseas project director at a company named Ziyan.
At the company’s stand, Wu handed out a brochure showing its star product: the Blowfish A2, a 62-centimeter tall helicopter drone with Kevlar armor.
“We can add an AK-47 or a machine gun. Different weapons can be installed, whatever the customer wants,” she said.
Abu Dhabi is already a customer while Pakistan is in discussions with the company to acquire the drone.
“We are targeting Western markets, too. Our product is of great quality,” she said. “We don’t fear competition from the Europeans and the Americans.”


Hackers attempt to take down UK Labour Party’s web services ahead of election

Updated 45 min 59 sec ago

Hackers attempt to take down UK Labour Party’s web services ahead of election

  • Britain’s security agencies have warned that Russia and other countries could use cyberattacks messages on social media to attempt to disrupt the election
  • The nature of such attacks often made it difficult to attribute responsibility to any particular group, a NCSC spokesman said

LONDON: Hackers attacked Britain’s opposition Labour Party, bombarding its web services with malicious traffic in an attempt to force them offline just weeks ahead of a national election, party and security officials said on Tuesday,
“We have experienced a sophisticated and large-scale cyberattack on Labour digital platforms,” Labour said in a statement. “We took swift action and these attempts failed due to our robust security systems.
The party was confident data breach occurred, it said.
Britain’s security agencies have warned that Russia and other countries could use cyberattacks or political messages on social media to attempt to disrupt the Dec. 12 election.
Moscow has repeatedly denied Western allegations of election interference and a person with knowledge of the matter said an initial investigation had found nothing to link the Labour Party attack to a foreign state.
Britain’s National Cyber Security Center, part of the GCHQ signals intelligence agency, said the attack was a distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack — a technique used by hackers to take down websites by overwhelming them with malicious traffic.
“DDoS attacks are a common form of attack used by a very wide range of attackers. Mitigation techniques are available and worked in this case,” a NCSC spokesman said.
The nature of such attacks often made it difficult to attribute responsibility to any particular group, he said.
Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn said the attack was very serious but was successfully repelled by the party’s defense systems when the digital assault began on Monday.
“But if this is a sign of things to come in this election, I feel very nervous about it all,” he said. “Because a cyberattack against a political party in an election is suspicious and something one is very worried about.”
A Labour spokesman said that while the attack had slowed down some campaign activity, they were restored on Tuesday.
The person with knowledge of the matter said any Labour Party web services currently offline were not directly connected to the attack.
Britain goes to the polls on Dec. 12 in an election called by Prime Minister Boris Johnson to try to break the Brexit deadlock in parliament more than three years since the country voted to leave the European Union.
A report by parliament’s Intelligence and Security Committee has investigated Russian activity in British politics and reportedly includes charges of spying and interference in polls, including the 2016 Brexit referendum and the 2017 national election.
The government, however, has declined to publish it before the upcoming election.