Pressure is on Argentina to beat Brazil in Jeddah, says Sergio Romero

Argentina easily saw off the challenges of Iraq 4-0 last Thursday. (AFP)
Updated 15 October 2018

Pressure is on Argentina to beat Brazil in Jeddah, says Sergio Romero

  • It may only be a friendly but Argentina goalkeeper says defeat against arch-rivals is not an option.
  • Clash in Jeddah will be the 105th time the South Americans have faced each other.

JEDDAH: Argentina may be without superstar Lionel Messi but the two-time world champions simply must beat Brazil in a friendly in Saudi Arabia on Tuesday, Manchester United goalkeeper Sergio Romero says.
This will be the 105th time the South American arch-rivals have faced each other in an official match, with Brazil marginally ahead on 40 wins to 38, with 26 draws.
And while Brazil, record five-time winners of the World Cup, have picked most of their star names, Argentina are without the likes of Manchester City’s in-form forward Sergio Aguero, Gonzalo Higuain of AC Milan and Paris Saint-Germain winger Angel Di Maria, as well as Messi.
“I would love Messi to be here because that would give us a boost in quality,” said Romero, back in the Argentina squad following a knee injury that prevented him from featuring in two friendlies in September.
“Adding the best in the world would be best for the future of the national team.”
Messi also sat out Argentina’s last three matches, all friendlies, since the country’s disappointing last 16 elimination from the World Cup in Russia.
He is believed to have asked for some time off from international duty ahead of next year’s Copa America in Brazil.He may have won the Ballon d’Or five times and helped Barcelona lift the Champions League four times and La Liga on nine occasions, but Messi’s only international honor was an Olympic gold medal in 2008.
He’s been on the losing side four times in major finals: the 2014 World Cup in Brazil and three Copa America title-deciders.
At 31, he’s starting to run out of opportunities to lead his country to international glory.
“I haven’t spoken to him since the World Cup, but I hope his absence is only short-term. Hopefully he’s just taking a rest,” added Romero.
Even without a host of star names, and despite the prestigious opposition, anything other than victory would be met with consternation back home.
“Every time Argentina play, we have to win. And when playing against Brazil, even in a friendly, we still have to win and play our way, which is what the coach is asking of us,” added Romero.
“Here we have a new group of players and we’ll try to do our best for the team.”

MESSI BARELY MISSED

Argentina have not missed Messi too much so far, beating Iraq 4-0 in Riyadh on Thursday, having beaten Guatemala 3-0 in September, when they also drew 0-0 with Colombia.
Interim coach Lionel Scaloni picked an inexperienced line-up to face Iraq with Romero, defender Ramiro Funes Mori and striker Paulo Dybala the only established names on the team-sheet.
It will likely be a different-looking XI in Jeddah to take on a Brazil team that labored to a 2-0 win over hosts Saudi Arabia in Riyadh on Friday.
Despite featuring the likes of PSG star Neymar and Manchester City’s returning forward Gabriel Jesus, Tite’s side struggled on a muggy night in the Arabian desert.
But with Barcelona’s Philippe Coutinho and Roberto Firmino of Liverpool likely to play too, Brazil won’t need any help in getting fired up to face the Albiceleste.
“Any game against Argentina is different, it takes on a huge dimension and we all know what this encounter means,” said Inter Milan defender Miranda.
“Our team has prepared well and we hope to play a great match and win.”
But just like Scaloni, Tite wants to give some younger players a chance to prove their worth.
He said it’s a match “between two teams undergoing a renovation. Here, we’re giving opportunities to youngsters.”
The two sides last met in June 2017 in a friendly in Australia, won 1-0 by Argentina, but Brazil romped to a 3-0 success in their last competitive fixture, a World Cup qualifier in November 2016.


FIA launches probe into fiery Grosjean crash at Bahrain Grand Prix

Updated 03 December 2020

FIA launches probe into fiery Grosjean crash at Bahrain Grand Prix

  • The Halo device is widely considered to have helped save Romain Grosjean’s life

SAKHIR, Bahrain: Motor racing chiefs announced on Thursday the launch of an investigation into Romain Grosjean’s fiery Bahrain crash, saying the forensic probe would take “around six to eight” weeks to complete.
The French Formula One driver somehow wrenched himself free from his blazing Haas car with just burns to his hands and a broken left foot after a collision with Daniil Kvyat on the first lap of Sunday’s Grand Prix. He left hospital on Wednesday.
In the immediate aftermath of the shocking smash there was widespread praise for modern safety measures in the sport, but also concern over what F1’s motor sport managing director Ross Brawn described as “unpredictable” failures.
The International Automobile Federation (FIA) said it had “initiated a detailed analysis of Romain Grosjean’s accident at the 2020 Bahrain Grand Prix.”
The FIA’s safety director, Adam Baker, said: “With so much data available in Formula 1, it allows us to accurately determine every element of what occurred and this work has already begun.
“We take this research very seriously and will follow a rigorous process to find out exactly what happened before proposing potential improvements.”
The FIA probe will look at a range of factors including Grosjean’s helmet, safety harness, headrest, in-car extinguisher and the Halo cockpit protection.
The Halo device is widely considered to have helped save Grosjean’s life as his car was sliced in two after careering into a barrier.
“The ‘halo’ saved the day and it saved Romain,” Brawn said on Sunday.
“There was controversy in developing it initially, but there can’t be any doubt now, so hats off to those who pushed for the introduction.”
But he added: “The fire is worrying. The split in the barrier is worrying and the barrier coming apart, but we can be happy with the safety of the car – that got us through today, but things failed in an unpredictable way.
“We haven’t seen anything like that for a very long time, but the barrier splitting normally results in a fatality.”
At the circuit new safety measures have been introduced to reduce the risk of a repeat crash at this Sunday’s Sakhir Grand Prix.
Two rows of tires wrapped in a conveyor belt have been installed in front of a reconstructed guardrail at the exit of Turn Three.
Several drivers expressed serious concerns at the failure of the barrier and the manner in which it was punctured.
In other changes to the circuit, where this weekend’s Grand Prix will be using the shorter “outer loop’, a kerb has been removed at Turn Nine – which was used as Turn 13 last Sunday – and a tire barrier in the approach to that corner has been extended and enlarged to four rows in depth.
Grosjean left hospital on Wednesday and in an Instagram post he highlighted the professionalism of a marshal with an extinguisher and the FIA doctor in the following Safety Car, who was on the scene very quickly.
“I told him he was a hero,” said Grosjean.
“He went into the fire as much as he could to save me. I felt Ian’s hands pulling me over the barrier and I knew I was safe... life will never be the same again.”
Grosjean is resting and healing from burns at a hotel in Abu Dhabi where he hopes he will be fit enough to race in the season-closing race next weekend.