Harley-Davidson to move some production out of US to avoid EU tariffs

Harley Davidson motorcycles are displayed for sale at a showroom in London, Britain, June 22 2018. (Reuters)
Updated 25 June 2018

Harley-Davidson to move some production out of US to avoid EU tariffs

  • The shift in production is an unintended consequence of Trump’s administration imposing tariffs on European steel and aluminum
  • In response to US tariffs, the EU began charging import duties of 25 percent on a range of US products

Harley-Davidson Inc. said on Monday it would move production of motorcycles shipped to the European Union from the United States to its international facilities and forecast the trading bloc’s retaliatory tariffs would cost the company $90 million to $100 million a year.
The shift in production is an unintended consequence of US President Donald Trump’s administration imposing tariffs on European steel and aluminum early this month, a move designed to protect US jobs.
In response to the US tariffs, the European Union began charging import duties of 25 percent on a range of US products including big motorcycles like Harley’s on June 22.
In a regulatory filing https://bit.ly/2tA1ru0 on Monday, the Milwaukee, Wisconsin-based company said the retaliatory duties would result in an incremental cost of about $2,200 per average motorcycle exported from the United States to the European Union, but it would not raise retail or wholesale prices for its dealers to cover the costs of the tariffs.
The company expects the tariffs to result in incremental costs of $30 million to $45 million for the rest of 2018, the filing said.
“Harley-Davidson believes the tremendous cost increase, if passed onto its dealers and retail customers, would have an immediate and lasting detrimental impact to its business in the region,” the company said.
Struggling to overcome a slump in US demand, Harley has been aiming to boost sales of its iconic motorcycles overseas to 50 percent of total annual volume from about 43 percent currently.
In January, the company announced the closure of a plant in Kansas City, Missouri as part of a consolidation plan after its motorcycle shipments fell to their lowest level in six years.
In 2017, Harley sold nearly 40,000 new motorcycles in Europe which accounted for more than 16 percent of the company’s sales last year. The revenues from EU countries were second only to the United States.
Harley said ramping-up production at its overseas international plants will require incremental investments and could take at least nine to 18 months.
The company will provide more details of the financial implications of retaliatory EU tariffs and plans to offset their impact on July 24 when its second-quarter earnings are due, the filing said.
Trump vowed to make the iconic motorcycle maker great again when he took office last year.
In late April, Harley said Trump’s metal tariffs would inflate its costs by an additional $15 million to $20 million this year on top of already rising raw material prices that it expected at the start of the year.


Deal on oil cuts ‘close’ as Saudi Arabia enlists G20

Updated 07 April 2020

Deal on oil cuts ‘close’ as Saudi Arabia enlists G20

  • ‘Virtual’ energy summit on Friday in new effort to stabilize market

DUBAI: Saudi Arabia plans to use its presidency of the powerful G20 group of nations in efforts to restore balance to global oil markets.

The Kingdom is organizing a special meeting of G20 energy ministers — including the other two biggest producers, the US and Russia — to discuss cuts to output.

The “virtual” summit is scheduled for Friday, the day after an OPEC+ meeting of oil producers. Crucially, the US, which is not an OPEC member, will be involved in the G20 summit, energy secretary Dan Brouillette said.

The initiative emerged after a weekend phone call between Prince Abdul Aziz bin Salman, the Saudi energy minister, and Fatih Birol, executive director of the International Energy Agency. The involvement of the G20 is part of the group’s remit, Birol told Arab News on Monday.

“The job description of the G20 is to provide and maintain financial stability, so it is in line with their aims,” he said.

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“The oil industry is going through one of the worst times in its history, and this could have major implications for the global economy, financial markets and employment. Saudi Arabia has been a stabilizing factor in the markets for many years.”

Saudi Arabia and Russia were “very, very close” to a deal to cut oil output, said Kirill Dmitriev, chief executive of the Russian Direct Investment Fund and a close confidant of President Vladimir Putin. An agreement would “bring so much important stability to the market,” he said.

Nevertheless, significant challenges remain. So far, talks between OPEC+ members have focused on a cut of about 10 million barrels per day. This would not be enough to outweigh global market oversupply estimated at more than 20 million barrels, amid a demand slump caused by the coronavirus pandemic.

There are also concerns about whether US producers would be permitted to take part in cuts. American antitrust law prohibits cartel practices, which would rule out a concerted move by its many oil companies.

Some energy experts have suggested that action by the Railroad Commission of Texas, which regulates the energy business in the biggest US oil state, could help limit overall US output.

On the markets, amid the continuing uncertainty, Brent crude was trading about 5 percent down, at just over $32.