Saudi’s NADEC agrees to acquire dairy competitor

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Updated 25 March 2018

Saudi’s NADEC agrees to acquire dairy competitor

DUBAI: Saudi Arabia’s National Agricultural Development Co. (NADEC) has agreed to buy Al Safi Danone Company (ASD) in a deal that will help boost its business in the dairy industry in the Kingdom and extend its geographic reach, it said on Sunday.
ASD, a producer of dairy and juice products, is a joint venture between Saudi Arabia’s Al Safi Group of Companies and French food company Danone. The value of the transaction was not disclosed.
Under the deal, NADEC will buy all the shares in ASD. In exchange, Al Safi shareholders will own 38.8 percent of NADEC.
The combination is an example of an M&A deal in a private sector that the government hopes will play an increasing role in diversifying the economy away from a reliance on oil revenues.
NADEC has a market capitalization of 3.2 billion riyals ($853 million), slightly smaller than that of Saudia Dairy & Foodstuff Company.
Both are dwarfed by Almarai,the Gulf’s largest dairy company, which has a market capitalization of 54.4 billion riyals.
NADEC is 20 percent owned by Saudi’s Public Investment Fund, with the rest publicy traded on the Saudi bourse.
NADEC said the move would help it develop a broader portfolio and enhance its regional reach outside the kingdom in the United Arab Emirates, Kuwait, Bahrain, Jordan and Lebanon, in addition to new countries such as Iraq and Oman. ($1 = 3.7498 riyals)


Scammers fool Britons with investment firm clones, says trade body

Updated 28 November 2020

Scammers fool Britons with investment firm clones, says trade body

  • Losses amounted to 9.4 million pounds ($12.56 million) between March and mid-October

LONDON: More than 200 British retail investors have lost nearly 10 million pounds ($13.4 million) in total to sophisticated investment scams since a government lockdown in March to fight the COVID-19 pandemic, a trade body said on Saturday.
Fraudsters cloned genuine investment management firms’ websites and documentation, and advertised fake products on sham price comparison websites and on social media, the Investment Association said.
Greater financial uncertainty and more time spent online have likely contributed to the increase in scams, industry sources say.
Losses amounted to 9.4 million pounds ($12.56 million) between March and mid-October, the IA said, based on information it got from member firms which had been cloned.
“In a year clouded in uncertainty, organized criminals have sought opportunity in misfortune by attempting to con investors out of their hard-earned savings,” Chris Cummings, chief executive of the Investment Association said.
The investment management industry was working closely with police and regulators to stop the scams, he added.
Britain’s Action Fraud warned earlier this month that total reported losses from all types of investment fraud came to 657 million pounds between September 2019 and September 2020, a rise of 28% from a year ago. Reports spiked between May and September, following Britain’s first national lockdown, the national fraud and cybercrime reporting center added.