Al-Saadi Qaddafi is still in prison, claims Libyan prosecutor

In this file photo, Saadi Qaddafi, son of Muammar Qaddafi, looks on inside a prison in Tripoli on Mar. 6, 2014. (Reuters)
Updated 23 December 2017

Al-Saadi Qaddafi is still in prison, claims Libyan prosecutor

LONDON: The Libyan prosecutor general’s office has allayed the fears of late President Muammar Qaddafi’s family that his son Al-Saadi Qaddafi has “disappeared” from prison in Tripoli, Asharq Al-Awsat reported.
The office said: “He is present, has not left the prison and will be put on trial.”
The Qaddafi family announced last week that they had “lost contact with Al-Saadi some time ago and could not find out where he was, or what his circumstances were.”
The family added: “All we know is that he is being held hostage in a prison run by the militias in the capital.”
However, the head of the investigations department at the Libyan prosecutor general’s office said: “The defendant Al-Saadi Al-Qaddafi is currently being tried for the charges against him according to Libyan law.”
Al-Saadi is Qaddafi’s third son and was a former deputy commander of security units in the old regime. The current authorities accuse him of involvement in suppressing the revolution that overthrew his father’s rule.
Al-Saadi escaped to Niger in 2011 but he was later handed over to the Libyan authorities in 2014.
He has been held in a prison in Tripoli since then whilst his trial has been postponed several times.


Egypt, UAE resume first Qatar flights since 2017

Updated 18 January 2021

Egypt, UAE resume first Qatar flights since 2017

  • An EgyptAir flight took off from Doha to Cairo, making it the first commercial flight in three and a half years between both countries
  • It was followed shortly after by the arrival of an Air Arabia flight from Sharjah in the UAE

DOHA: The first direct flights since 2017 between Qatar and its former rivals Egypt and the UAE took to the skies on Monday, following the end of a regional crisis.
Egypt and the United Arab Emirates (UAE) joined Saudi Arabia and Bahrain in cutting ties with Qatar in June 2017, accusing it of being too close to Iran and of backing Islamic extremists, charges Doha denies.
The quartet agreed to heal the rift at a Gulf summit on January 5 in Saudi Arabia, after a flurry of diplomatic activity by outgoing US President Donald Trump’s administration.
The first commercial flight from Qatar to Egypt in three and a half years, an EgyptAir service to Cairo, took off from windswept Doha airport.
It was followed shortly after by the arrival of an Air Arabia flight from Sharjah in the UAE.
The resumption of flights from Doha to Cairo will simplify travel for the large contingent of Egyptians living in Qatar.
As many as 300,000 Egyptians call Qatar home, according to official statistics, but many were unable to travel home during the crisis.
In May 2020, frustrated Egyptians protested outside the compound housing Egypt’s then-empty embassy.
Following the demonstration, 18 repatriation flights operated via neutral Oman to comply with Cairo’s ban on direct air traffic.
A Qatar Airways plane was due to also make the trip to Cairo later Monday.
Flights between Doha and Saudi Arabia, which has also opened its land border to Qatar, resumed on January 11.
The row complicated regional travel, divided families and raised costs faced by Qatari businesses.
Mustafa Ahmed, 38, an Egyptian technical engineer, said he was “very happy.”
“With direct flights, life will be easier, especially for families and children, avoiding the torment of changing airports and planes and waiting for hours for transit flights,” he told AFP.
Egyptians in Qatar work in a number of sectors including education, health care and engineering.
Thousands of Qatar’s majority-expatriate workforce, however, have lost their jobs as a result of a downturn caused by the coronavirus epidemic.