Libyan rival officials meet for UN-led talks on elections

Speaker of Libyan House of Representatives, UN Special Adviser on Libya and President of Libya's High State Council of State give a press conference at the UN in Geneva. (AFP)
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Updated 28 June 2022

Libyan rival officials meet for UN-led talks on elections

  • Two senior Libyan officials from the country's rival camps have begun talks on constitutional arrangements for elections

GENEVA: Two senior Libyan officials began two days of talks Tuesday on constitutional arrangements for elections, the latest UN effort to bridge gaps between the country’s rivals.
Aguila Saleh, the influential speaker of the country’s east-based parliament, and Khaled Al-Meshri, head of the government’s Supreme Council of State, based in the west, in the capital of Tripoli, met at the UN headquarters in Geneva.
According to the United Nations, the talks will focus on a draft constitutional framework for elections after Libya’s rival factions failed to reach an agreement in their last round of talks in the Egyptian capital of Cairo.
Stephanie Williams, the UN special adviser on Libya, said they would discuss “timelines, modalities and milestones to guarantee a clear path to the holding of national elections as soon possible.”
“It is now the time to make a final and courageous effort to ensure that this historic compromise takes place, for the sake of Libya, the Libyan people and the credibility of its institutions,” she said.
The criteria for a presidential candidacy were a contentious point in the talks, according to Libyan media. The Tripoli-based council insisted on banning military personal from running for the country’s top post — apparently a move directed at the divisive commander Khalifa Haftar, whose forces are loyal to the east-based administration.
Haftar had announced his bid in elections slated for last December but the vote was not held because of myriad issues, including controversial hopefuls who had announced bids and disputes about election laws.
There are growing tensions on the ground, and sporadic clashes between rival militias recently erupted in Tripoli. Living conditions have also deteriorated, mainly because of fuel shortages in the oil-rich nation. Tribal leaders have shut down many oil facilities, including the country’s largest field.
The blockade was largely meant to cut off key state revenues to the incumbent Prime Minister Abdul Hamid Dbeibah, who has refused to step down even though the vote was not held in December.
Now, Dbeibah and another prime minister, Fathy Bashagha, appointed by the east-based parliament to lead a transitional government, are claiming power. The rivalry has sparked fears the oil-rich country could slide back to fighting after tentative steps toward unity last year.
Libya has been wrecked by conflict since a NATO-backed uprising toppled and killed longtime dictator Muammar Qaddafi in 2011. The country was then for years split between rival administrations in the east and west, each supported by different militias and foreign governments.


US studying Iran’s response to EU proposal to save nuclear deal -State Dept

Updated 18 sec ago

US studying Iran’s response to EU proposal to save nuclear deal -State Dept

WASHINGTON: The United States is studying Iran’s response to the European Union’s proposal to save a nuclear deal and is sharing its views with the bloc, a US State Department spokesperson said on Tuesday, after receiving Iran’s comments from the EU.
Iran responded to the European Union’s “final” draft text to save a 2015 nuclear deal on Monday, an EU official said, as the Iranian foreign minister called on the United States to show flexibility to resolve three remaining issues.

Iraq’s Sadr backtracks on call for huge protest

Updated 32 min 5 sec ago

Iraq’s Sadr backtracks on call for huge protest

  • The populist cleric's announcement came amid behind the scenes talks aimed at steering Iraq out of crisis
  • Sadr wants parliament dissolved to pave the way for new legislative elections

BAGHDAD: Iraq’s firebrand Shiite cleric Moqtada Sadr backtracked Tuesday after earlier urging his supporters to join a massive rally as a standoff with his political rivals appeared to be getting worse.
The populist cleric’s announcement came amid behind the scenes talks aimed at steering Iraq out of crisis, with the country’s two branches of Shiite Islam jockeying for supremacy.
More than 10 months on from elections, Iraq still has no government, new prime minister or new president, because of disagreement between factions over forming a coalition.
Sadr wants parliament dissolved to pave the way for new legislative elections, but his rivals the pro-Iran Coordination Framework want to set conditions and are demanding a transitional government before new polls.
The cleric’s bloc emerged from last October’s elections as parliament’s biggest, but still far short of a majority.
Sadr, whose supporters have been staging a sit-in protest outside parliament in Baghdad’s high security Green Zone for more than two weeks, had called for a “million-man demonstration” in the capital on Saturday.
But on Tuesday he announced on Twitter “the indefinite postponement of Saturday’s protest.”
“If you had been betting on a civil war, I am betting on preserving social peace. The blood of Iraqis is more precious than anything else,” Sadr said.
Late on Monday, a committee organizing demonstrations in support of the Coordination Framework also announced new gatherings, but without setting a date.
The Coordination Framework launched their own Baghdad sit-in on Friday, camping out on an avenue in the capital.
The Coordination Framework comprises former paramilitaries of the Tehran-backed Hashed Al-Shaabi network and the party of former premier Nuri Al-Maliki, a longtime Sadr foe.
So far, the rival Shiite protests have been peaceful, with attempts at mediation ongoing.
Hadi Al-Ameri, leader of a Hashed faction, has also called for calm and for dialogue. He has had a series of meetings with political leaders including allies of Sadr.
Also on Tuesday, Finance Minister Ali Allawi who is in the current government submitted his resignation to the Council of Ministers, the INA state news agency reported.
Iraq has been ravaged by decades of conflict and endemic corruption.
It is blighted by ailing infrastructure, power cuts and crumbling public services, and now also faces water shortages as drought ravages swathes of the country.
Despite its oil wealth, many Iraqis are mired in poverty, and some 35 percent of young people are unemployed, according to the United Nations.

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Pakistan forms cabinet committee on climate change as over 600 killed in monsoon rains this year

Updated 46 min 27 sec ago

Pakistan forms cabinet committee on climate change as over 600 killed in monsoon rains this year

  • Committee to give recommendations on short, medium, and long term projects to prevent effects of climate change
  • According to NDMA, 635 people killed across Pakistan in torrential rains, floods since June 14 this year 

ISLAMABAD: Pakistan’s federal cabinet on Tuesday approved the formation of a cabinet committee chaired by the minister for climate change to give recommendations on short, medium, and long term projects to mitigate the growing effects of climate change.

Pakistan is among the top eight countries most affected by climate change while it’s share in global warming gas emissions is only 1 percent of the world. 

The country has faced unprecedented monsoon downpours this year, with 635 killed in rains and floods since June 14, according to the National Disaster Management Authority’s (NDMA) latest figures. The dead include 136 women and 233 children. More than 196 deaths were reported from the impoverished southwest province of Balochistan, 141 from Punjab, 137 from Sindh, and 122 from Khyber Pakhtunkhwa.

According to a latest alert by the Flood Forecasting Division of the Pakistan Meteorological Department, India released 1,71,797 Cusecs from Ujh Barrage on August 15, with likely water flow increases in River Ravi at Jassar ranging between 70,000 Cusecs to 1,00,000 Cusecs, which could result in medium to high flood levels.

“The cabinet unanimously approved the formation of a cabinet committee under the chairmanship of Federal Minister for Climate Change Sherry Rehman, which will also include ministers from the relevant ministries,” a statement issued by the prime minister’s office said after a meeting of the cabinet.

The committee will give recommendations on short, medium, and long term projects to prevent the effects of climate change, the statement added.

“We are glad that the prime minister has announced the formation of an inter-ministerial committee on climate adaptation with the participation of agriculture, food security, water, and others to sit together and devise an action plan for adaptation for all these sectors,” climate change minister Sherry Rehman said during the briefing to cabinet.

The minister said Pakistan would be water scarce by 2025 and the country has faced 152 extreme events in the last two decades with constant shifts in rainfall patterns, intensity, and frequency. 

“We are also home to the hottest cities in the world for three years straight with temperatures rising up to 53.7C, which is an unlivable situation,” Rehman told the cabinet, adding that due to its impact on food security Pakistan had an up to 40 percent food insecure population. 

“We have lost 1.8 million acres of fertile land to sea intrusion due to rising sea levels and lose 27,000 acres of forest annually,” she added.

Speaking in the cabinet, prime minister Shehbaz Sharif said climate change, water security, and food security were three interrelated challenges and needed urgent measures to combat them and protect future generations. 

“The government is well aware of the expected problems arising from climate change,” the PM said, “and solving this problem is among the top priorities of the government.”


Juventus newcomer Di Maria sidelined by thigh injury

Updated 16 August 2022

Juventus newcomer Di Maria sidelined by thigh injury

  • Di Maria scored the opening goal in Monday's 3-0 win over Sassuolo in his first game for his new club
  • Juventus said scans showed Di Maria had suffered a "low-grade lesion" to his left thigh

ROME: Argentina winger Angel Di Maria faces a spell on the sidelines after picking up a thigh injury on his Juventus debut, the Serie A club said on Tuesday.
Di Maria scored the opening goal in Monday’s 3-0 win over Sassuolo in his first game for his new club after his move from Paris Saint-Germain.
The 34-year-old also set up Dusan Vlahovic for the second of his two goals but was substituted midway through the second half.
Juventus said scans showed Di Maria had suffered a “low-grade lesion” to his left thigh, adding that the injury would be re-evaluated in 10 days.
He will miss at least the next two league games against Sampdoria and Roma.
Juventus were already without Paul Pogba, who hurt his knee on a pre-season trip to the US after rejoining the Turin club following six years with Manchester United.
The France midfielder is undergoing a course of “conservative therapy” and could return in mid-September.


Jill Biden tests positive for COVID-19, ‘mild’ symptoms

Updated 16 August 2022

Jill Biden tests positive for COVID-19, ‘mild’ symptoms

  • She has been prescribed the antiviral drug Paxlovid and will isolate at the vacation home for at least five days

KIAWAH ISLAND, South Carolina: First lady Jill Biden tested positive for COVID-19 and was experiencing “mild symptoms,” the White House announced Tuesday.
She had been vacationing with President Joe Biden in South Carolina when she began experiencing symptoms on Monday. She has been prescribed the antiviral drug Paxlovid and will isolate at the vacation home for at least five days.
Joe Biden tested negative for the virus on Tuesday morning, the White House said, but would be wearing a mask indoors for 10 days in line with Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidance. He recovered from a rebound case of the virus on Aug.7.