US regulator blasts own agency’s report on crude price collapse

The Commodity Futures Trading Commission’s report failed to explain the plunge in US crude oil futures, according to one commissioner. (Shutterstock)
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Updated 25 November 2020

US regulator blasts own agency’s report on crude price collapse

  • ‘While some may have hoped for a more definitive analysis, we simply cannot provide that at this time’

NEW YORK: One of the commissioners of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission on Tuesday criticized as “incomplete and inadequate” the federal agency’s report on April’s plunge in oil futures deep into negative territory.

Dan Berkovitz, one of five CFTC commissioners, said the report, issued on Monday, “does not provide the public with an adequate explanation for the extraordinary price collapse” on April 20 in US crude oil futures.

On that day, the price of US West Texas Intermediate crude plunged briefly to as low as negative-$40 a barrel.

Monthly contract expiries can prompt volatile trade, but the negative move was unprecedented.

In its report, the CFTC cited a series of occurrences, including the collapse in demand due to the COVID-19 pandemic and a surge in supply.

On April 20, oil futures sank as contract holders realized they didn’t want to take delivery of oil they wouldn’t be able to sell or store. The selloff intensified in the last minutes of trading, with the contract closing at -$37.63 a barrel.

Berkovitz said that the report, published by the market oversight division, fails to fully analyze the “flash crash” in the last 20 minutes of trading that took the contract from $0 to below negative-$40.

He said the report also did not adequately assess rumors of low storage availability in Cushing, Oklahoma, the delivery point for the contract, or late-arriving trades that influenced the day’s action.

“The issuance of an incomplete preliminary report is a disservice to the public, market participants, and small and large businesses that depend on a reliable crude oil futures benchmark for contract pricing, risk mitigation, and price discovery,” he said.

The CFTC, in its report published on Monday, said a root cause analysis evaluating individual price movements was beyond the report’s scope, adding that further data, information, and analysis may affect the observations.

Officials also did not comment on reports of a probe into trading activities that led to negative prices. “While some may have hoped for a more definitive analysis, we simply cannot provide that at this time,” said Chairman Heath Tarbert on Monday.

Of the CFTC commissioners, just one other has released a separate statement, Commissioner Rostin Benham, who also raised some questions, including whether stronger risk controls are necessary. 


HSBC to axe 82 branches in UK, cut services in others

Updated 19 January 2021

HSBC to axe 82 branches in UK, cut services in others

  • The lender said it would be left with 511 branches in the UK following the closures

LONDON: HSBC said on Tuesday it planned to axe 82 branches in Britain this year after a drop in footfall across its retail network and a surge in digital banking.
The lender said it would be left with 511 branches in the UK following the closures, with many of the remaining branches set to be refurbished with some providing fewer services.
The COVID-19 pandemic has dented bank finances, putting pressure on lenders to cut costs, while more customers have opted to bank online as people have been encouraged to stay at home to combat the spread of the virus.
HSBC said it had begun trialing different branch formats and decided to provide fewer full-service branches focused in large cities and towns, with others providing cash or self-service technology.
The bank said ‘pop-up’ mobile branches would also be rolled out later this year.
“The direction of travel is really quite clear and this is borne out by the reduction in branch usage and increase in digital interaction that we are seeing first-hand,” said Jackie Uhi, HSBC UK’s head of network.