Amid e-commerce boom, anti-Amazon Shopify takes flight

Shopify saw the number of new stores created on its platform jump 71 percent in the second quarter. (Shutterstock)
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Updated 19 October 2020

Amid e-commerce boom, anti-Amazon Shopify takes flight

  • Founded 15 years ago in Ottawa, Shopify allows businesses to create an e-commerce site in just a few clicks

TORONTO: The pandemic has forced businesses worldwide to pivot online to survive, and many have turned to Shopify, a Canadian company that has emerged as a thriving alternative to Amazon.

Founded 15 years ago in Ottawa, Shopify allows businesses to create an e-commerce site in just a few clicks. Already growing with more than 1 million e-stores at the end of 2019, its user base has exploded.

“The retail world that would have existed in 2030 has really been pulled back into 2020,” Shopify president Harley Finkelstein said in an interview with AFP.

“It feels like the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic has permanently accelerated the growth of online commerce.”

Amid a lockdown of bricks and mortar stores, online commerce has boomed this year. Consumers have grown accustomed to buying over the internet, and industry giants, led by Amazon, have seen sales rocket.

At the same time, many businesses that did not have a presence or a direct online sales channel took the plunge as the pandemic took hold.

Popular with entrepreneurs, Shopify saw the number of new stores created on its platform jump 71 percent in the second quarter compared to the previous one.

One of these new e-merchants is Tariq Al-Barwani, creator of Plentea, a tea bar in Toronto that remained open in March at the start of the lockdown.

But with only a handful of customers a day, the situation quickly became untenable, forcing him to go out of business in May.

The same month, supported by a municipal program helping small businesses affected by the crisis to go digital, he opened a store on Shopify.

“It took us a week,” he recalls from his living room, overlooking Lake Ontario, where he now works. “If you are used to going on the internet, it is easy to understand.”

Shopify has become a resounding success far from Silicon Valley.

It was co-founded in 2006 by Tobias Lutke, a young German who had moved to Canada for love and designed the software originally to sell snowboards over the internet.

Hailed for its simplicity, it has seen the number of stores on its platform grow from 150,000 in 2014 to over 1 million — in 175 countries — in 2019, asserting itself in the eyes of many independent merchants as an alternative to Amazon.

“For retail to thrive, it has to be in the hands of the many, not the few,” Finkelstein said.

“We need to have as many retailers, as many brands, as many entrepreneurs and small businesses selling, so that we don’t all look the exact same, (and) so we don’t buy the exact same stuff.”

More bluntly, Lutke, now 40, said on Twitter last year: “Amazon is trying to build an empire. Shopify is trying to arm the rebels.”

When they created their clothing line in 2015, the Toronto-based founders of Kotn, a brand that emphasizes traceability, went straight to Shopify.

Shopify is also enjoying growing success with established brands looking to sideline intermediaries who sell their wares and to build direct relationships with customers.


Sweden bans Huawei, ZTE from upcoming 5G networks

Updated 20 October 2020

Sweden bans Huawei, ZTE from upcoming 5G networks

  • European governments have been reviewing the role of Chinese companies in building their networks
  • Sweden’s security service called China ‘one of the biggest threats against Sweden’
STOCKHOLM: Swedish regulators on Tuesday banned the use of telecom equipment from China’s Huawei and ZTE in its 5G network ahead of the spectrum auction scheduled for next month.
The Swedish Post and Telecom Authority (PTS) said auctions the setting of the license conditions followed assessments by the Swedish Armed Forces and security service.
European governments have been reviewing the role of Chinese companies in building their networks following pressure from the United States, which says they pose a security threat because, among other concerns, Chinese companies and citizens must by law aid the state in intelligence gathering.
Sweden’s security service called China “one of the biggest threats against Sweden.”
The United Kingdom in July ordered Huawei equipment to be purged completely from Britain’s 5G network by 2027, becoming one of the first European countries to do so.
Huawei and ZTE did not immediately respond to requests for comment on the decision by Sweden, home to Ericsson, one of Europe’s leading telecoms equipment suppliers.
“The ban leaves network operators with less options and risks slowing the rollout of 5G in markets where competition is reduced,” said Ben Wood, chief of research at CCS Insight.
The ban is likely to benefit rival telecom equipment makers Ericsson and Finland’s Nokia.
PTS said companies taking part in the auction must remove Huawei and ZTE gear from existing central functions by Jan. 1, 2025.
The regulator defined central functions as equipment used to build the radio access network, the transmission network, the core network and the service and maintenance of the network.
PTS said the license conditions were decided to address the assessments made by the armed forces and security service.
It has approved the participation of Hi3G Access, Net4Mobility, Telia Sverige and Teracom in the planned spectrum auction of 3.5 GHz and 2.3 GHz, key bands crucial for the rollout of 5G.
Tele2 and Telenor will participate together as Net4Mobility to secure spectrum for a joint nationwide 5G network.
Tele2, which uses Huawei equipment in its network, which had earlier called Huawei an important vendor, said the PTS decision “does not change our plans substantially.”
“We may have to phase different costs differently between years to meet security conditions on time,” a spokesman told Reuters.
The 5G spectrum auction was originally planned for early 2020, but last year PTS said it would delay the auction due to a security review. PTS announced in April this year that the auction would begin in November.