Lebanon’s Kataeb Party says its three MPs resigning from parliament

Members of the Kataeb Party salute the coffin of the party’s Secretary-General Nazar Najarian, who was killed by Tuesday’s explosion, during his funeral procession in Beirut on Saturday, Aug. 8, 2020. (AP)
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Updated 10 August 2020

Lebanon’s Kataeb Party says its three MPs resigning from parliament

  • ‘The Kataeb MPs have decided ... to move to confrontation for the sake of a free, sovereign, independent Lebanon’

DUBAI: Lebanon’s Kataeb Party, a Christian group which opposes the government backed by the Iran-backed Hezbollah, announced on Saturday the resignation of its three lawmakers from parliament.
The decision was announced by party chief Samy Gemayel during the funeral of a leading member of the group who died in the catastrophic explosion at the port of Beirut on Tuesday, which destroyed parts of the Lebanese capital.
“The Kataeb MPs have decided ... to move to confrontation for the sake of a free, sovereign, independent Lebanon,” he said. “I invite all honorable (lawmakers) to resign so that the people can decide who will govern them, without anybody imposing anything to them.”
Hezbollah, the only group which has kept its weapons since Lebanon’s 1975-90 civil war, and its allies hold a majority in the current 128-seat parliament, elected in 2018.


Libya’s NOC lifts force majeure on El-Feel oilfield

Updated 40 min 56 sec ago

Libya’s NOC lifts force majeure on El-Feel oilfield

  • NOC said it expected its total oil output to reach 800,000 barrels per day within two weeks

BENGHAZI: Libya’s National Oil Corp. (NOC) said on Monday it had lifted force majeure on the El-Feel oilfield and that by doing so it had ended all the closures of oilfields and ports that resulted from an eight-month blockade by eastern forces.
NOC said on Friday it expected its total oil output to reach 800,000 barrels per day (bpd) within two weeks and 1 million bpd within four weeks after lifting force majeure on the ports of Ras Lanuf and Es Sider.
The blockade was imposed in January by Khalifa Haftar’s Libyan National Army (LNA) and ended in September when he agreed to reopen oil facilities after talks with members of the internationally recognized Government of National Accord (GNA).
NOC has been gradually lifting force majeure in facilities where fighters no longer remained and restarting production in them.
On Sunday a first tanker in eight months docked at Al-Zawiya port and began loading, an engineer there said, after force majeure was lifted last week on Sharara, Libya’s biggest oilfield.
Al-Waha Oil Co, an NOC company, also said on Sunday a first tanker was bound for Es Sider and may dock there early on Tuesday.
Force majeure refers to unexpected external circumstances that prevent a party to a contract, in this case NOC, from meeting its obligations.