FM Qureshi dismisses reports of friction, says Pakistan, Saudi close allies

Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan meet with Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman during his visit to Kingdom on September 19, 2020. (SPA)
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Updated 09 August 2020

FM Qureshi dismisses reports of friction, says Pakistan, Saudi close allies

  • Says his OIC statement was decontextualized and used for ‘political point scoring’ by opposition parties 
  • Praises Saudi Arabia for always being Pakistan’s ‘supporter and well-wisher’ 

ISLAMABAD: Foreign Minister Shah Mehmood Qureshi categorically denied on Friday that there was any diplomatic tension between Pakistan and Saudi Arabia, saying that the two countries enjoyed strong and exemplary relationship since they had always been close friends and allies. 

Qureshi made the statement on Geo News, a local television channel, during an interview in which he was asked about his recent comments on the Saudi-led Organization of Islamic Cooperation in which he had said that his country would raise the Kashmir issue outside the framework of the inter-governmental Muslim organization if a conference of OIC foreign ministers was not held on Kashmir.

His statement was immediately condemned by opposition politicians who described it as “irresponsible” and reminded the government that Pakistan’s relations with Saudi Arabia were critically important. 

Discussing the situation, Qureshi said that the opposition had decontextualized his statement and was indulging in “political point scoring.” 

“After the United Nations, where we have taken up the Kashmir issue three times in the last one year, the second biggest forum is the OIC,” he explained. “The OIC has consistently maintained a historic position over the issue. It also established a contact group that releases joint communiques focusing on rights violations in occupied Kashmir.” 

However, he added that the OIC Council of Foreign Ministers was a relevant forum to discuss the challenges faced by Muslims around the world. It was also the best platform to discuss “the anti-Muslim sentiments prevailing in India.” 

“I am, therefore, respectfully asking that forum to understand the sentiments of the people of Pakistan and Kashmir,” he continued. 

Qureshi denied that Saudi Arabia had somehow resisted Pakistan’s requests on Kashmir, saying he was particularly thankful to the Saudi foreign minister who raised fine points while addressing the issue from the OIC forum. 

“Saudi Arabia is our supporter and well-wisher,” he continued. “I know how many Pakistanis live and work in the Kingdom. I am also aware of the fact that the Saudi authorities have helped us in difficult situations, and I am going to reiterate that defending the Saudi land is like a sacred responsibility for us, and we are going to do that even by putting our own lives in danger. It is important, however, that they should also heed the desires of our people.” 

He maintained that he only sought the meeting of OIC foreign ministers since it was going to have a major diplomatic impact, adding that anything the participants said during the congregation was going to resonate with people around the world. 

“One only makes such demands while dealing with close friends,” he noted. “Such demands are not made in relationships with distances.” 


Urdu comic book 'Little Master' to help Pakistani children fight COVID-19 misinformation

Updated 19 September 2020

Urdu comic book 'Little Master' to help Pakistani children fight COVID-19 misinformation

  • The book tells the story of a young boy from Karachi's Lyari, who is learning about the virus to help others
  • 'Little Master' is illustrated by Umair Najeeb Khan, the creator of Pakistan’s first superhero comic book series 'Paak-Legion'

RAWALPINDI: "Little Master," an Urdu-language comic book, is going to be released on Monday to guide Pakistani children how to stay safe amid the coronavirus pandemic and cope with COVID-19 misinformation.
Published by Mehrdar Art & Production (MAP), the book tells the story of Ahmed, a young boy from Karachi's Lyari area, who is trying to learn about the coronavirus to help keep others safe, regardless of their community background.
"Comics are a great way to tell a story positively and are really useful in countering misinformation,” Muhammad Faheem, documentary filmmaker and MAP founder, told Arab News on Saturday.

The cover of "Little Master," an Urdu-language comic book to help Pakistani children cope with COVID-19 misinformation. (Photo courtesy of Muhammad Faheem via AN)

The efforts have been funded by MAP itself and through government and private support. To illustrate "Little Master," Faheem asked for help Umair Najeeb Khan, the creator of Pakistan’s first superhero comic book series "Paak-Legion."
Thousands of copies of "Little Master" will be distributed at schools in underprivileged areas such as Lyari, where misinformation has led to blame games and community tensions that affected virus response. Some narratives even questioned the very existence of the virus and necessity to follow any precautions against it.

Umair Najeeb Khan is working on an illustration for the "Little Master" comic book in Islamabad on Sept. 19, 2020. (Photo courtesy of Umair Najeeb Khan via AN)

In May, Faheem rolled out "Hum Sab Saath, Corona ki Kilaaf" ("All of Us Together Against the Coronavirus"), a campaign through posters, social media and talks by community leaders to address the situation.
"It got to the point where relief efforts in these areas were being compromised because people were questioning who deserved help," Faheem said. "We needed to address not only the severity of what was going on but educate the citizens of these areas on what was real information to help combat the fake news and rising bigotry."
The comic book is a follow up to these efforts.
"When kids read our comics, we hope they will learn more about the pandemic and how it is a collective effort that we all have to join together, regardless of our backgrounds."