Indonesia’s anti-trust watchdog levies $3 million in fines on Grab and partner

Indonesia’s anti-trust watchdog said Grab had discriminated against its drivers, prioritizing those provided by partner PT Teknologi Pengangkutan Indonesia to the Softbank-backed firm. (AFP file photo)
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Updated 03 July 2020

Indonesia’s anti-trust watchdog levies $3 million in fines on Grab and partner

  • Grab infringed the anti-monopoly laws after evaluating the case
  • Grab is Southeast Asia’s most valuable startup with a valuation of $14 billion

JAKARTA: Indonesia’s anti-trust watchdog announced fines totaling more than $3 million for Grab and its business partner after finding it guilty of breaking anti-monopoly laws, a verdict the ride-hailing firm vowed to appeal.
The Business Competition Supervisory Commission (KPPU) said it had found Grab had discriminated against its drivers, prioritizing those provided by partner PT Teknologi Pengangkutan Indonesia (TPI) to the Softbank-backed firm.
In a statement, Dinni Melanie, the chair of the watchdog judicial panel, said it had found Grab infringed the anti-monopoly laws after evaluating the case on Thursday evening.
The agency imposed a fine of $2.1 million on Grab and a penalty of $1.03 million rupiah on TPI.
A spokesman for Grab, which is Southeast Asia’s most valuable startup with a valuation of $14 billion, said the firm would appeal the verdict.
“Grab’s view is that it has not violated any regulation, engaged in any anti-competitive business practices, or injured any third parties,” he said, characterizing the watchdog’s findings as “unsubstantiated allegations.”
Reuters could not immediately reach TPI to seek comment.


Creditors take action against Al Jaber in decade-long saga

Updated 23 September 2020

Creditors take action against Al Jaber in decade-long saga

  • The downturn in the Gulf construction sector has triggered a number of corporate restructurings as companies are forced to reschedule debt, raise fresh borrowing or enter insolvency protection

DUBAI: Creditors have started to enforce claims against Abu Dhabi-based Al Jaber Group, in a dispute triggered by a construction downturn in the UAE more than a decade ago.

Al Jaber, a contractor with interests across a range of sectors, has struggled since building up debt in the wake of a UAE real estate crisis and began talks with creditors in 2011.

Abu Dhabi Commercial Bank, which is working as restructuring and security agent, said in a document dated Sept. 21 which was seen by Reuters, that it had instructions from the majority of creditors to proceed with claims against Al Jaber.

A representative for Al Jaber did not immediately respond to a request or comment. ADCB declined to comment.

The move follows delays in restructuring agreements, under which Al Jaber was to appoint a new board and sell companies and assets such as the Shangri-La hotels in Dubai and Abu Dhabi.

In exchange, creditors had agreed to extend the maturity of a 5.9 billion dirhams ($1.61 billion) loan, cut interest rates, and provide additional revolving debt.

The initial enforcement action now being pursued by creditors includes the “acceleration and demand for payment of amounts outstanding” under the previously agreed debt restructuring, a source familiar with the matter said.

Enforcement will also allow creditors to claim against Al Jaber’s chairman under a 4.5 billion dirham loan to the company.

Several UAE companies have sought to extend debt maturities or agree better terms in recent years to avoid defaults, after an oil price crash hit energy services and construction.

The coronavirus crisis has added to the strain and Arabtec Holding, the UAE’s biggest listed contractor, this week will discuss options including dissolution after the pandemic hit projects and led to additional costs.

Meanwhile, Dubai-listed construction firm Drake & Scull is working to reach an agreement with its creditors in an out-of-court process.