Investigation sought into death of Korean triathlete who claimed abuse

Choi Suk-hyeon is shown in this picture posted on the website of the World Triathlon, which is seeking an inquiry into the South Korean triathlete's supposed suicide death. (Photo credit: World Triathlon)
Short Url
Updated 03 July 2020

Investigation sought into death of Korean triathlete who claimed abuse

  • Choi Suk-hyeon took her own life after enduring years of abuse, the World Triathlon claims

LAUSANNE, Switzerland: Triathlon’s governing body has joined an investigation into the death of a South Korean competitor who was reportedly subjected to years of physical and mental abuse.
“World Triathlon is deeply saddened and shocked to hear of the death of ... Choi Suk-hyeon who, according to media reports, ‘took her own life after enduring years of abuse,’” the body said in a statement on Thursday.
“The World Triathlon safeguarding and anti-harassment group has also contacted the Korean federation to make sure that while the investigation is carried out, all Korean triathletes are protected and safe.”
The body has asked the South Korean Triathlon Federation and the South Korean Sports and Olympic Committee to share information.
Choi, who was 22, died last Friday. She was first picked in the national team in 2015, while still in high school. Her last major race was in October, when she finished the South Korean championship in 14th place.
The Korea Herald said on Thursday that Choi’s family said she filed criminal complaints in February against her coach, doctor and teammates on the Gyeongju city team. The Daegu District Prosecutors’ Office was investigating her death and claims.
She gave the same report in April to the national federation and Olympic committee. The family said Choi was frustrated by the lack of action.
Federation president Park Suk-won said in a statement they were “taking this case very seriously.”
The Olympic committee said it sent an inspector in April to check Choi’s claims.
Five public petitions on the website of the South Korean president’s office to look into the cause of Choi’s death had drawn more than 58,000 signatures on Thursday in less than 24 hours.


England-Pakistan: ICC to use front foot no-ball tech for first time in test cricket

Updated 05 August 2020

England-Pakistan: ICC to use front foot no-ball tech for first time in test cricket

  • Responsibility to call no-balls when a bowler oversteps the mark currently lies with on-field umpires
  • Under new system TV umpire will monitor landing foot after each ball and tell umpires whether it was legal delivery

MANCHESTER: Front foot no-ball technology will be used for the first time on a trial basis in test cricket during the three-match series between England and Pakistan starting later on Wednesday, the International Cricket Council has said.
The responsibility to call no-balls when a bowler oversteps the mark currently lies with on-field umpires, but under the new system the TV umpire will monitor the landing foot after each ball and communicate to the umpires whether it was a legal delivery.
“Front foot no ball technology to be used in ICC World Test Championship series featuring England and Pakistan, with the support of both teams,” the world governing body tweeted.
“Performance of the technology in these tests will be reviewed before any decisions taken on its future use in test cricket.”
The ICC has already conducted successful trials of the technology across men’s 50-over international matches while it was also used at the women’s Twenty20 World Cup in Australia earlier this year.
However, the governing body wants to ascertain the benefits of its use in the longest format of the game before deciding whether to widen its use.
England will host Pakistan in the three-test series at bio-secure venues in Manchester and Southampton.