DJs call the tune at Riyadh fashion pop-up

Moh Flow, a Syrian artist based in Dubai, delivered a hit set-list to an enthralled audience.
Short Url
Updated 23 December 2019

DJs call the tune at Riyadh fashion pop-up

  • The pop-up event focused on Saudi fashion with exclusive live art, photography, community talks and music

RIYADH: Leading DJs followed up their set lists with words of inspiration at a pop-up event in Riyadh hosted by Saudi fashion label AA (A for Anonymous).

Saudi “X-Factor Arabia” winner Hamza Hawsawi, Vinyl Mode, Moh Flow, DJ Majid and DJ Baloo were among performers and artists helping AA celebrate Vision 2030 as well as the Kingdom’s youth culture in fields including music, philanthropy, sports and entrepreneurship.

The pop-up event, held at streetwear outlet Urbn Lot last week, focused on Saudi fashion with exclusive live art, photography, community talks and music.

DJ Majid set the stage with an uplifting set before being joined by his friend DJ Mohammed Nassar, aka Vinyl Mode. Both performed at MDL Beast, the region’s biggest music festival, held in Riyadh at the weekend.  

“These are exciting times. I got to play at MDL Beast with my brothers. This is a great moment in history,” Majid told Arab News.

Inspiration

Moh Flow, a Syrian artist based in Dubai, delivered a hit set list to an enthralled audience.

“I am a huge Moh Flow fan and I am so excited to see him in Riyadh,” Mazen, a visitor said.

HIGHLIGHTS

• Saudi philanthropist Wid Enani, founder of Live to Give, a Jeddah charity organization, encouraged young citizens to volunteer and ‘connect to their community to make it a better place.’

• Saudi artists Nawaf and Abdullah created live art. ‘It is an honor to be here and do this,’ they said.

• Yara, a young female rapper from Jeddah, traveled to Riyadh for her first performance in the capital.

The “X-Factor” winner, who made an appearance on the MDL Beast main stage on Saturday, “inspires us to believe that dreams can come true,” Abdullah, a blogger at the event, told Arab News.

“For all those who love to sing and have a passion, he has been brave enough to take the risk and pave the way.”

Speaking at the event, Saudi philanthropist Wid Enani, founder of Live to Give, a Jeddah charity organization, encouraged young Saudis to volunteer and “connect to their community to make it a better place.”

Yara, a young female rapper from Jeddah, traveled to Riyadh for her first performance in the capital.

“It is amazing to see female rappers get a platform in Riyadh,” she said. “I’ve never seen this before.”

Saudi artists Nawaf and Abdullah also created live art. “It is an honor to be here and do this,” they said.


What We Are Reading Today: The Age of Hiroshima

Updated 19 January 2020

What We Are Reading Today: The Age of Hiroshima

Authors: Michael D. Gordin and G. John Ikenberry

On Aug. 6, 1945, in the waning days of World War II, the US dropped an atomic bomb on the Japanese city of Hiroshima. The city’s destruction stands as a powerful symbol of nuclear annihilation, but it has also shaped how we think about war and peace, the past and the present, and science and ethics. 

The Age of Hiroshima traces these complex legacies, exploring how the meanings of Hiroshima have reverberated across the decades and around the world, says a review on the Princeton University Press website.

Michael D. Gordin and G. John Ikenberry bring together leading scholars from disciplines ranging from international relations and political theory to cultural history and science and technology studies, who together provide new perspectives on Hiroshima as both a historical event and a cultural phenomenon. 

As an event, Hiroshima emerges in the flow of decisions and hard choices surrounding the bombing and its aftermath. As a phenomenon, it marked a revolution in science, politics, and the human imagination — the end of one age and the dawn of another.