Bono, U2 play their first-ever concert in India

Mumbai is the last leg on The Joshua Tree Tour 2019 — named after the Irish band U2’s seminal album. (AFP)
Updated 16 December 2019

Bono, U2 play their first-ever concert in India

  • U2 are the latest in a series of major international acts to tour the South Asian country
  • Mumbai is the last leg on The Joshua Tree Tour 2019, named after the band’s seminal album

MUMBAI: Irish rockers U2 played their first-ever concert in India Sunday, with top celebrities and mega-fans converging from across the vast nation to the coastal city of Mumbai.
U2 are the latest in a series of major international acts to tour the South Asian country, with Beyonce, Shakira, Coldplay, Demi Lovato and Bryan Adams among the superstars who have played to packed venues.
Some 35,000 tickets were estimated to have been sold for the concert at the D.Y. Patil Sports Stadium, local media reported, with top Bollywood stars posing for photos before entering the venue.
Ahead of the concert, the band posted on their social media accounts a photo of the words “Ahimsa is the highest ideal.”
“We were shaped and formed by Martin Luther King Jr who was a student of Mahatma Gandhi,” frontman Bono told the NDTV news television channel in September.
“So we come as students to the source of inspiration that is ‘Ahimsa’ — non-violence. Indians gave us this. It is the greatest gift to the world.”
Mumbai is the last leg on The Joshua Tree Tour 2019 — named after the band’s seminal album — which kicked off on November 8 in Auckland.
The Asia Pacific tour, which first started with stadium concerts in North America and Europe in 2017, marks three decades since the Irish group’s “The Joshua Tree” was released.
Released in March 1987, “The Joshua Tree” reached into the roots of Irish and American music and produced classic hits “With or Without You,” “Where the Streets Have No Name” and “I Still Haven’t Found What I’m Looking For.”


KFC apologizes for ‘sexist’ Australian ad

Updated 21 January 2020

KFC apologizes for ‘sexist’ Australian ad

  • The ad shows a woman dressed in a short playsuit as she looks at her reflection in the window of a parked car
  • The Zinger Popcorn box ad has so far garnered over 60,000 views

KFC on Tuesday apologized for an advertisement in Australia that shows two boys ogling at a woman's low-cut top, after calls from a local campaign group to boycott the fast-food giant over the ad it called “sexist.”
The 15-second ad, which has been running on television for the past three weeks and is also posted on KFC Australia’s YouTube channel, shows a woman dressed in a short playsuit  as she looks at her reflection in the window of a parked car.
The car’s window then rolls down to show two young boys staring at the woman, before she smiles and says, “Did someone say KFC?“
The Zinger Popcorn box ad has so far garnered over 60,000 views with over 160 dislikes and 700 likes on YouTube.
“We apologize if anyone was offended by our latest commercial. Our intention was not to stereotype women and young boys in a negative light,” a spokesperson for Yum Brands-owned KFC’s South Pacific unit said.
While many viewers did not approve of the ad, some took to Twitter to label the ad “funny” and said there was no need for the company to apologize.
Collective Shout, a group which campaigns against the objectification of women, condemned the ad and said it was a “regression to tired and archaic stereotypes where young women are sexually objectified for male pleasure.”
“Ads like this reinforce the false idea that we can’t expect better from boys. It is another manifestation of the ‘boys will be boys’ trope, hampering our ability to challenge sexist ideas which contribute to harmful behavior toward women and girls,” the group’s spokeswoman, Melinda Liszewski, said.
Last month, exercise bike maker Peloton Interactive Inc. faced heavy criticism for its Christmas advertisement, in which a woman receiving the company’s bike as a gift from her husband was called “sexist” and “dystopian” on social media.
Some said the husband was “controlling” and “manipulative” as buying his wife an exercise bike suggested that she needed to lose weight.
Both ads were criticized nearly a month after they were first published on online media and television.