Saudi business chiefs back 2020 budget

The Saudi Budget 2020 Forum in Riyadh. (AFP)
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Updated 11 December 2019

Saudi business chiefs back 2020 budget

  • 2020 spending plan hailed as a positive driver in boosting country’s economy

RIYADH: Saudi businesses have welcomed spending plans of SR1.02 trillion ($272 billion) next year, announced by King Salman.

The Council of Saudi Chambers praised the efforts of the monarch, Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman and others in reaching an agreement on the 2020 budget.

The government has predicted revenues of SR833 billion and a deficit of SR187 billion for next year, considered an indicator of the success of the Kingdom’s economic policies amid a bleak global economic backdrop.

Chairman of the Council of Saudi Chambers Dr. Sami Abdullah Al-Abaidi said that the Saudi business sector was optimistic about the new spending plans.

“These figures reflect the effective impact of the economic reform measures, the economy’s restructuring and diversification of sources of income,” he added.

Al-Abaidi praised the king and the crown prince for supporting the Saudi economy through numerous projects and initiatives aimed at boosting the business sector.

He said the most notable were business performance improvement initiatives, privatization, private-sector stimulation and local promotion programs.

“This has paved the way for the Kingdom to get the best international classifications, including its first world ranking in business environment reforms, which made it a hub for investments,” Al-Abaidi added.

The business chief reiterated King Salman’s determination to continue implementing reforms, diversifying sources of income, making optimal use of resources, empowering the private sector, and improving transparency and efficiency in government spending to boost growth rates.

“These trends are one of the most important requirements for achieving the Kingdom’s Vision 2030,” he said.

The council’s vice chairman, Muneer bin Saad, said the budget for the new year focused on investing in the human element and sectors that directly affected the lives of citizens, including the development of services.

Saad added the monarch had directed to extend the disbursement of the cost of living allowance until the end of 2020.

Council member Abdullah Al-Odaim said the budget met the expectations of Saudi citizens, and strengthened the confidence of international investors, as figures showed the determination of the state to move forward in its policies to raise the efficiency of government spending.

They also showed increases in non-oil revenues, projected to grow more in light of the improvement of economic activity.

The delegated secretary-general of the Council of Saudi Chambers, Hussain Al-Abdulqader, said the Saudi business sector welcomed the budget which through
its projects and programs would help improve investment opportunities as well as the Saudi economy, ultimately strengthening the Kingdom’s global economic standing.


Berlin’s ill-fated new airport finally ready for take-off

Updated 28 October 2020

Berlin’s ill-fated new airport finally ready for take-off

  • The airport, located in the south-east of the capital, was originally due to open in 2011
  • BER initially projected to cost $2 billion but already was past the $7.6 billion mark

BERLIN: Nine years late and eye-wateringly over budget, the Berlin region’s new international airport will finally open on Saturday — in the middle of a global pandemic that has crippled air travel.
“We are ready for take-off!” insists the management team at the new Berlin Brandenburg Airport (BER), set to replace the German capital’s aging Tegel and Schoenefeld airports.
But the mood is one of relief rather than celebration.
Ever since construction began on BER in 2006, the project has been dogged by one failure after another, becoming a financial black hole and a national laughing stock — not exactly an example of German efficiency.
The airport, located in the south-east of the capital, was originally due to open in 2011.
Now it is opening its doors in the middle of the worst crisis the aviation industry has ever seen, as COVID-19 restrictions continue to suffocate air travel.
And as if that were not enough, there’s also the climate crisis: pressure group Extinction Rebellion is planning acts of “civil disobedience” on the opening day to protest against the impact of aviation on global warming.
Against that backdrop, “We will simply open, we will not have a party,” according to Engelbert Luetke Daldrup, president of the airport’s management company.
Lufthansa and EasyJet will be the first two airlines to touch down on the tarmac of what will be Germany’s third-largest airport, after Frankfurt and Munich.
A few days before the opening, around 200 staff were busy disinfecting the 360,000-square-meter Terminal 1.
Some 100 alcoholic hand gel dispensers have been installed and robot vacuum cleaners hum over the floors.
The “Magic Carpet,” a huge, bright red artwork by American artist Pae White suspended from the ceiling, brings a touch of color to the check-in hall.
The airport has been designed to welcome 27 million passengers a year, but in November it will see only 20 percent of usual air traffic thanks to the pandemic.
Terminal 2 won’t open until spring 2021.
About 15 shops and restaurants out of just over 100 will remain shut, while the rest will be forced to keep “limited opening hours” because of low traffic through the airport, a spokesman said
None of this good news for BER, initially projected to cost $2 billion but already past the $7.6 billion.
The airport has been granted $353 billion in state aid to help safeguard the jobs of the 20,000 people who will eventually work there until the end of 2020.
The health crisis is already having an impact on employment at the hub: at the end of July, Berlin’s airports announced the loss of 400 jobs out of a total of 2,100.
EasyJet has said it will cut 418 jobs in the German capital, and Europe’s leading airline Lufthansa, Germany’s flagship carrier, is to shed 30,000 jobs worldwide.
“We fear even greater job losses in the future,” a spokesman for the Verdi union said.
Luetke Daldrup hopes the situation will improve “from the spring onwards.” But the International Air Transport Association does not expect global air traffic to reach pre-crisis levels until 2024.
In the state of Brandenburg, which surrounds Berlin, local leaders remain optimistic about the prospects for development.
“No hotel has so far postponed its investment plans because of the pandemic,” insists Olaf Luecke, president of the local branch of Germany’s hotel and catering trade union (DEHOGA).
Construction work began in September on two 14,000-square-meter (150,000-square-foot) hotel complexes, due to open in 2022.
And in anticipation of the opening of BER, US electric-car giant Tesla has chosen Brandenburg as the location of its first European factory, which is set to employ 40,000 people.
“Having new, modern infrastructure will be beneficial in any case, despite the pandemic,” according to Carsten Broenstrup of the state employers’ association.
But “if there is not a vaccine soon, it will be a very big problem,” he admits.