What We Are Reading Today: Told Again by Walter de la Mare

Updated 01 December 2019

What We Are Reading Today: Told Again by Walter de la Mare

  • His abundant literary gifts can be savored once more in this beautiful new edition

Originally published in 1927, Told Again is a beautiful collection of elegant fairy tales, showcasing the formidable talents of Walter de la Mare, one of the most celebrated writers of children’s literature during the first half of the 20th century. 

His abundant literary gifts can be savored once more in this beautiful new edition. 

Nineteen adapted classics, including “Rapunzel,” “Little Red Riding-Hood,” “Rumplestiltskin,” and “The Sleeping Beauty,” are made new by de la Mare’s poetic insights and graceful prose, making these tales appropriate for younger readers. 

With marvelous black and white illustrations by A. H. Watson, this volume also presents a splendid introduction by Philip Pullman, the contemporary master of fantasy literature, says a review on the Princeton University Press website.

An English poet, short story writer, and novelist, Walter Mare is best remembered for his poem “The Listeners,” and for a highly acclaimed selection of subtle psychological horror stories, among them “Seaton’s Aunt” and “All Hallows.”


What We Are Reading Today: Kill Reply All by Victoria Turk

Updated 18 January 2020

What We Are Reading Today: Kill Reply All by Victoria Turk

Victoria Turk’s Kill Reply All “is one of the more amusing digital-etiquette books you’ll read,” says a review in The New York Times. 

“Simply put, social media has created a new universe of ways we can be mean to one another. So digital good manners are a great kindness, whether they apply to friends, work or love,” it added.  

Turk “provides an indispensable guide to minding our manners in a brave new online world, and making peace with the platforms, apps, and devices we love to hate,” said another critic.

A review in goodreads.com said the digital revolution “has put us all within a few clicks, taps, and swipes of one another. But familiarity can breed contempt, and while we’re more likely than ever to fall in love online, we’re also more likely to fall headfirst into a raging fight with a stranger or into an unhealthy obsession with the phones in our pockets. If you’ve ever encountered the surreal, aggravating battlefields of digital life and wondered why we all don’t go analog, this is the book for you.”