Trump: Without trade deal, US will hike China tariffs further

President Donald Trump listens during a cabinet meeting at the White House, Tuesday, Nov. 19, 2019, in Washington. (AP)
Updated 19 November 2019

Trump: Without trade deal, US will hike China tariffs further

  • Trump's latest tough comment came as markets are watching intensely for signs of progress

WASHINGTON: US President Donald Trump said on Tuesday that he would raise tariffs on imports of Chinese goods if no trade deal is reached with Beijing to end a tit-for-tat trade war that has roiled markets and damaged growth worldwide.

Speaking at a cabinet meeting at the White House, Trump added that China is going to have to make a trade deal.

"If we don't make a deal with China, I'll just raise the tariffs even higher," he told reporters at the White House.

Trump's latest tough comment came as markets are watching intensely for signs of progress in the two economic superpowers' attempt to reach a so-called "phase one" partial deal taking the heat out of a growing trade war.


China calls expulsion of diplomats from US a ‘mistake’

Updated 19 min 31 sec ago

China calls expulsion of diplomats from US a ‘mistake’

  • It comes days after they announced a truce in the form of a mini-deal to reduce some tariffs in a bruising trade war which has weighed on both sides
  • The incident appeared to be the first time in more than 30 years that the US has expelled Chinese diplomats on suspicion of espionage

BEIJING: China on Monday called the expulsion of diplomats from the US a “mistake,” following reports that Washington quietly expelled two embassy officials in September after they drove onto a sensitive military base in Virginia.
The incident is the latest spat between the world’s two biggest economies and comes days after they announced a truce in the form of a mini-deal to reduce some tariffs in a bruising trade war which has weighed on both sides.
Commenting on The New York Times report, foreign ministry spokesman Geng Shuang called the accusations “completely contrary to the facts” and said they “strongly urge the United States to correct its mistake.”
Geng said Beijing had lodged “solemn representations and protests to the US” and called for Washington to “protect the legitimate rights and interests of Chinese diplomats.”
The incident appeared to be the first time in more than 30 years that the US has expelled Chinese diplomats on suspicion of espionage, the newspaper said Sunday, citing people familiar with the episode.
At least one of the diplomats was believed to be an intelligence officer operating under cover, the Times said.