Bolivian mob attacks politician, cuts her hair, cover her in paint and force her to march barefoot

The mayor of the Bolivian town of Vinto and member of his ruling Movement for Socialism (MAS) party, Patricia Arce, is being humiliated by a mob of opposition supporters, in Vinto, close to Cochabamba, on November 6, 2019. (AFP)
Updated 08 November 2019

Bolivian mob attacks politician, cuts her hair, cover her in paint and force her to march barefoot

  • The opposition mob stormed the municipal headquarters and dragged the mayor into the street before setting the building ablaze

LA PAZ: Bolivia’s President Evo Morales condemned on Thursday an attack on a female mayor in which an opposition mob forcibly cut her hair, covered her in paint and marched her barefoot through the streets.
Bolivia has been rocked by deadly post-election violence over opposition claims that Morales rigged his re-election last month.
A 20-year-old student died in clashes Wednesday between pro- and anti-government demonstrators in the central city of Cochabamba, bringing the overall toll to three dead since the October 20 election.
In nearby Vinto, an opposition mob stormed the municipal headquarters and dragged the mayor, Patricia Arce, into the street before setting the building ablaze.
Morales said in a tweet Thursday that Arce — a member of his ruling Movement for Socialism (MAS) party — had been “cruelly abducted for expressing and defending her ideals and the principles of the poorest.”
Television images showed her on the ground, her hair cut, and covered in red paint. She was dragged and forced to walk barefoot through the town by the mob, before being rescued by police on motorcycles.
Morales’ party demanded the police bring the perpetrators to justice.
Arce’s office told local media Thursday the mayor “is recovering” from her ordeal.
“For these people, being a woman is a crime, being humble is a crime, having a skirt is a crime, said Vice President Alvaro Garcia.
“This has never happened in our democracy. That is called fascism: attacking women, assaulting them for their ethnic status. What Bolivia is facing is a fascist wave.”
The Women’s Social Organizations, linked to the ruling party, expressed “outrage” at the attack, and “for all the insults of hatred, racism, discrimination and violence” of the opposition.

 


Most licenses valid for Pakistan pilots working abroad: Regulator

Updated 16 July 2020

Most licenses valid for Pakistan pilots working abroad: Regulator

  • Airlines in 10 countries had demanded proof of valid flying licenses for their Pakistani pilots
  • In all, the foreign airlines asked for proof of 176 Pakistani pilot licenses

KARACHI: Pakistani authorities said Thursday they had confirmed the credentials of almost all Pakistani pilots working for foreign airlines, as the country battles a scandal over aviator licenses.
Airlines in 10 countries had demanded proof of valid flying licenses for their Pakistani pilots after it emerged about a third of Pakistan International Airlines (PIA) aviators were holding “bogus or suspicious” licenses.
In all, the foreign airlines asked for proof of 176 Pakistani pilot licenses.
Of these, 166 “have been validated as genuine and certified by the CAA (Civil Aviation Authority) Pakistan as having no anomaly,” the agency said in a statement.
The “process for the remaining 10 shall be concluded by next week,” it added.
Pakistan’s aviation minister sent shockwaves through the industry last month by revealing that some 260 pilots had dubious licenses.
About 150 worked for state-owned PIA — almost one-third of the airline’s staff of 434 pilots.
The announcement came a month after a PIA plane crashed into houses in Karachi, killing 98 people.
Investigators have largely blamed the crash on the pilots, though both had valid licenses.
The 10 airlines asking for proof of valid Pakistani pilots’ licenses were from Turkey, the United Arab Emirates, Oman, Qatar, Kuwait, Bahrain, Turkey, Malaysia, Vietnam and Hong Kong, according to the CAA.