Palestinian inventor sees aquaponics as vital to agricultural transformation

Growing concern: An aquaponic project run by Maroof Rabba’ and his wife Suhad has attracted interest from local and global investors. (Supplied)
Updated 25 October 2019

Palestinian inventor sees aquaponics as vital to agricultural transformation

  • Nablus-based Maroof Rabba' was inspired after seeing the difficulties farmers faced
  • Rabba' plans to build a farm in a remote area where no water or electricity is available

AMMAN: Israeli curbs on Palestine have hit all types of economic activity but especially agriculture, with water restrictions severely affecting farmers. 

Seeing the poor state of many Palestinian farms, Maroof Rabba’, a Nablus-based accountant, began to teach himself aquaponics, a technique that combines hydroponics — the cultivation of plants in water — and fish farming.

Rabba’, a skilled linguist, became a master of the craft by reading books in Italian and English, and researching online.

“There is very little material on the subject in Arabic,” said Rabba’, 43. “I was in contact with many experts worldwide, and they helped me start my project.”

His company, Petrichor Aquaponics, today operates an 80 square meter greenhouse, and has drawn a strong response locally and internationally, especially from farmers and potential investors

“People are now more familiar with the concept. In Palestine, we have a lot of agricultural challenges because of political, environmental and ecological problems, especially lack of water,” Rabba’ said.

Remarkably, aquaponics requires a mere 10 percent of the water used in conventional agriculture. Greenhouses are transformed into huge fishponds where fish and plants exist symbiotically. A biofilter converts ammonia from fish droppings into nitrates that serve as fertilizer. The plants also clean the water, which means it can be reused indefinitely.

“We don’t use any chemicals,” Rabba’ said.

Unable to import machinery for this system due to Israeli restrictions, Rabba’ learned to design and make the equipment himself.

“Electronics and programming are other hobbies of mine,” he said.

Tomatoes, for example, need eight hours of sunlight a day, so LED lighting is essential to ensure crops get sufficient light, especially during winter.

“The system is automatic. I set the controls and it operates itself,” Rabba’ said. “An aquaponics system without controls and timers isn’t going to work.”

The farm is home to two species of fish. The long-living koi are bred to make fertilizer, and also for sale to pet shops and aquariums. Tilapia are bred for food consumption, as well as to create fertilizer.

The farm also grows hot peppers, which are sold to shops in Nablus and mostly used to make shatta, a popular hot sauce.

“The peppers provide a good source of income for us,” says Rabba’, whose wife, Suhad, and sister, Ghada, act as partners in the project.

By the end of 2019, Petrichor will move to premises that will be around three times the size of its current farm.

“I’m going to focus on rarer products, such as herbs for natural medicine and saffron,” Rabba’ said.

“If you produce these herbs via conventional farming, it’s expensive, whereas my method is cheaper and organic, too.”

He also plans to build a farm in the remote countryside west of Nablus where no water or electricity is available.

“It has an ideal climate. I will bring water and use solar panels for power,” Rabba’ said. “The farm will have a smart system that will allow it to operate on its own. As well as growing crops, it will be a place to test new aquaponic systems.

“I will design and implement similar projects for local farmers that will provide another source of income for my company.”

Rabba’ aims to quit his regular job with the Nablus municipality and devote himself full time to his startup, which he has funded with his own savings.

“That wasn’t easy because it cost a lot when I was trying to make the machines and was experimenting with the processes,” he said.

“It took quite a while to perfect the systems. I made a lot of mistakes while learning. As I developed my knowledge, I lost less money, and as the project developed, I began to make money from crop and fish sales.”

* This report is being published by Arab News as a partner of the Middle East Exchange, which was launched by the Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum Global Initiatives and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation to reflect the vision of the UAE prime minister and ruler of Dubai to explore the possibility of changing the status of the Arab region.


Scarlett Johansson remarries in ‘intimate ceremony’

Updated 30 October 2020

Scarlett Johansson remarries in ‘intimate ceremony’

  • Johansson was previously married to Canadian actor Ryan Reynolds and French journalist Romain Dauriac

LOS ANGELES: Hollywood star Scarlett Johansson has married for a third time, tying the knot at an “intimate ceremony” over the weekend with comedian Colin Jost, it was announced Thursday.
Johansson, the world’s top-paid actress last year who is set to star in the much-delayed Marvel superhero film “Black Widow,” announced the nuptials through food charity Meals on Wheels.
The pair wed in front of “immediate family and loved ones, following COVID-19 safety precautions,” the charity wrote on Instagram.
“Their wedding wish is to help make a difference for vulnerable older adults during this difficult time by supporting @mealsonwheelsamerica,” said the post, inviting donations.
The 35-year-old star became engaged to “Saturday Night Live” writer and actor Jost, 38, in May 2019 after two years of dating.
New York-born Johansson was previously married to Canadian actor Ryan Reynolds and French journalist Romain Dauriac.
After a series of child roles, Johansson came to prominence in Sofia Coppola’s Oscar-winning 2003 romantic comedy “Lost in Translation.”
She has since transitioned to A-list roles, including eight Marvel film appearances as Natasha Romanoff, and earned $56 million to top Forbes’ 2019 top-paid actress list.
Johansson earned two Oscar nominations last year, for “Jojo Rabbit” and “Marriage Story.”
In addition to her acting, Johansson has previously spoken out for women’s causes: she was one of the first to join and help finance the Time’s Up movement that works to defend victims of sexual harassment and abuse.