Scotland plead for World Cup go-ahead as typhoon threatens campaign

Gregor Townsend urged Rugby World Cup authorities to leave no stone unturned in ensuring his side’s must-win match against Japan is played as an incoming super typhoon threatens to end their campaign. (Reuters)
Updated 10 October 2019

Scotland plead for World Cup go-ahead as typhoon threatens campaign

  • Scotland need to beat the hosts in Yokohama on Sunday to have a chance of reaching the quarter-finals
  • Officials announced that Saturday’s matches between England and France, and Italy and New Zealand, have been axed because of the expected impact of Super Typhoon Hagibis

TOKYO: Scotland coach Gregor Townsend has urged World Cup chiefs “to do all they can” to make sure his side’s must-win match against Japan is played as an incoming super typhoon threatens to end their campaign.
Scotland need to beat the hosts in Yokohama on Sunday to have a chance of reaching the quarter-finals. But if the match is canceled they will be going home.
In an unprecedented move for the tournament, officials announced Thursday that Saturday’s matches between England and France, and Italy and New Zealand, had been axed because of the expected impact of Super Typhoon Hagibis, likely to be the biggest storm to hit Japan this year.
Scotland’s final Pool A fixture against Japan in Yokohama, at 7:45 p.m. (1045 GMT) on Sunday, is also in the projected path of the typhoon, but officials will delay a decision on whether it will go ahead until the morning of the match.
Cancellation would see the match declared a 0-0 draw, with both Japan and Scotland receiving two points each.
That would put Japan through to the knockout phase, with Ireland likely to join them provided they don’t slip up against Samoa on Saturday.
It would also mean Scotland were out, leading to more World Cup heartache after a controversial refereeing decision led to them being denied a quarter-final win over Australia four years ago.
But Townsend, during a hastily-arranged press conference at Scotland’s hotel in Hamamatsu on Thursday, said: “We believe the game hasn’t been canceled because the weather forecast is much improved for Sunday.
“It looks like the game will be played and that’s what we have to keep faith with.
“I’d hope that everyone who is involved in the tournament would want the game to be played and that they will do all they can to ensure that it is.
“We have to have faith in the organizers that the game will be played even if it’s behind closed doors or at a different venue.”
Former Scotland fly-half Townsend added: “The way I read the rules was that you can’t change days but you could change venues and contingencies would be in place.
“I’ve since been told there is a force majeure (provision in the rules) and things can change because of exceptional circumstances.
“If that means (playing the game on) Monday because it takes a day for things to be put back in order then who knows. But right now I think they’re planning on it going ahead on Sunday.”
Scottish Rugby responded to Thursday’s announcement by World Rugby with a statement that said it “fully expects contingency plans to be put in place to enable Scotland to contest for a place in the quarter-finals on the pitch.”
But World Cup tournament director Alan Gilpin said Thursday teams knew long before the event started that “matches in the pool phase wouldn’t be postponed.”
He added: “We have looked again at the potential to apply some consistency to our contingency plan across all the games and we treat all the matches fairly.
“Italy are in the same position as Scotland are in. It (Japan v Scotland) is a huge match and we would love to play that game.
“But we won’t treat that match any differently.”


Russian athletics champ blasts own sports authorities

Updated 11 December 2019

Russian athletics champ blasts own sports authorities

  • Lasitskene, a three-time world champion, has in the past been critical of Russia’s athletics federation

MOSCOW: Russian high jump world champion Maria Lasitskene on Tuesday accused her country’s own sports authorities of failing to protect athletes from the deepening doping crisis, in a rare public broadside at top officials.

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) on Monday handed Russia a new, this time four-year, ban from top global sporting events, including the next summer and winter Olympics and the 2022 soccer World Cup, for tampering with laboratory data.

The ruling means Russian athletes cleared to compete at the 2020 Tokyo Olympics will do so under a neutral flag. But Lasitskene and some other Russian track and field athletes face additional obstacles to being cleared for competition.

“I’ve already missed one Olympics and one-and-a-half years of international competition,” Lasitskene wrote in an open letter addressed to Russia’s sports authorities.

“And it seems that’s not the end of it. So who ultimately is to blame? Who’s going to give me back what I’ve lost?” she wrote in the letter published on Russian sports media outlet Championat.Com.

Lasitskene, a three-time world champion, has in the past been critical of Russia’s athletics federation, which has been suspended for doping since 2015, and has been one of the few Russian athletes to voice her anger publicly.

World Athletics, the global body governing athletics, last month halted the reinstatement procedures for Russia’s athletics federation after its president and six others were provisionally suspended for serious breaches of anti-doping rules.

As a result of these fresh sanctions, World Athletics also said it was reviewing the process it has used in the past to clear some Russians, including Lasitskene, to compete internationally as neutrals.

“Why have we arrived at a situation when an athlete is supposed to be delighted about getting neutral status?” Lasitskene wrote.

“Was the Sports Ministry and Russian Olympic Committee really happy with the Russian athletics federation’s work?”

The president of Russia’s Olympic Committee, Stanislav Pozdnyakov, on Monday dismissed the sanctions against Russia as inappropriate and excessive.