Saudi Arabia’s Defense Ministry displays Iranian drones, cruise missiles used in Aramco attacks

1 / 7
Weapons used to attack Saudi Arabia at the Defense Ministry press conference about Iranian involvement in Saturday's Aramco attacks. (AFP
2 / 7
Weapons used to attack Saudi Arabia at the Defense Ministry press conference about Iranian involvement in Saturday's Aramco attacks. (AN photo)
3 / 7
Col. Turki Al-Maliki said the investigation so far has proved that the attack was not launched from Yemen. (AN photo)
4 / 7
Weapons used to attack Saudi Arabia at the Defense Ministry press conference about Iranian involvement in Saturday's Aramco attacks. (AN photo)
5 / 7
Weapons used to attack Saudi Arabia at the Defense Ministry press conference about Iranian involvement in Saturday's Aramco attacks. (Reuters)
6 / 7
Weapons used to attack Saudi Arabia at the Defense Ministry press conference about Iranian involvement in Saturday's Aramco attacks. (Reuters)
7 / 7
Weapons used to attack Saudi Arabia at the Defense Ministry press conference about Iranian involvement in Saturday's Aramco attacks. (Reuters)
Updated 20 September 2019

Saudi Arabia’s Defense Ministry displays Iranian drones, cruise missiles used in Aramco attacks

  • Defense ministry spokesman says attacks were “unquestionably” sponsored by Iran
  • Investigations are still underway to pinpoint the exact launch location, but definitely not yemen

RIYADH: Saudi Arabia displayed Iranian drones and cruise missiles that it said were used in an attack against Aramco facilities at the weekend.

The attacks were “unquestionably” sponsored by Iran but investigations are still underway to pinpoint the exact launch location, defense ministry spokesman Col. Turki Al-Maliki said at a news conference in Riyadh.

However he said that the strikes came from  north of the targets and not from Yemen, where Houthi militants claimed they had been launched from on Saturday. 

“The attack was launched from the north and unquestionably sponsored by Iran," he told a news conference. “The evidence ... that you have seen in front of you, makes this undeniable.”

“The precision impact of the cruise missile indicates advanced capability beyond the capacity of Iran’s proxies. The targeting direction of the site indicates a north-to-south direction of travel.”

Eighteen drones and three missiles were launched against Abqaiq, the location of the world’s largest oil-processing facility, but the missiles “fell short” of the target, Al-Maliki said. A further four missiles targeted the Khurais oil field, he added.




The defense ministry showed how many drones (UAV) and cruise missiles (LACM) hit each of the two Aramco sites on Saturday. (Screengrab)Caption

The Ya Ali missiles, which have a range of 700 kilometers, are known to have been used by Iran’s Revolutionary Guards, he said.

UN experts have already traveled to Saudi Arabia to investigate the attacks, UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres said. He warned of “devastating” consequences should the crisis escalate.

Earlier, the Saudi ambassador to London said Iran was almost certainly behind the attacks on an oil processing facility and an oil field that cut the Kingdom’s oil production by half. 

The US has blamed Iran for the attacks and officials told Reuters that they originated in south-western Iran and involved cruise missiles and drones.

Iran-backed Houthi militants initially claimed they had carried out the attack from Yemen, where Saudi Arabia is part of a coalition supporting government forces fighting the militia. 

*With Reuters


Italian consul general announces partnership with Danube

Updated 19 November 2019

Italian consul general announces partnership with Danube

  • Danube will be the first to sell bresaola, an Italian specialty of lean dried salted beef, in Saudi Arabia

JEDDAH: Stefano Stucci, Italy’s consul general in Saudi Arabia, announced his partnership with Danube Co., a supermarket and hypermarket chain in the Kingdom, to introduce Italian products to Saudi consumers.
The announcement coincides with Italian Cuisine Week, which is taking place on Nov. 18-24.
As of Nov. 19, Danube will be the first to sell bresaola, an Italian specialty of lean dried salted beef, in Saudi Arabia.
“It’s great to be able to do this partnership with Danube. Food is culture, but it’s also business, as it amounts to 10 percent of my country’s GDP (gross domestic product),” said Stucci.
“Danube is one of the biggest food distributors and importers, not only in Saudi Arabia but in the Middle East, so it’s really a pleasure to do this partnership with them,” he added.
“Food means a lot to us (Italians). It’s culture, sharing, being together, work, business. It’s really a big pleasure to share this part of our culture with you.”
Waleed Bindawood, chief commercial officer of Bindawood Group, which owns and operates Danube, said introducing bresaola follows Danube’s legacy of introducing new products to Saudi consumers.
“The campaign is a splendid initiative to create awareness of some of Italy’s best-known food brands to Saudi consumers and facilitate them in our Danube stores, offering the chance to sample these wonderful Italian products,” he added.
Bindawood told Arab News that Danube is honored to launch this partnership, adding: “Beef bresaola will be sold exclusively in our branches in Danube across the Kingdom.”
Italian Cuisine Week, which has been celebrated for four years now, promotes traditional Italian food, which is a central part of the country’s identity. This year, it includes cooking events and food trucks.

Related