Algeria army chief wants presidential election in December

Demonstrators shout slogans and gesture during a protest demanding social and economic reforms, as well as the departure of the country's ruling elite in Algiers, Algeria August 30, 2019. (Reuters)
Updated 02 September 2019

Algeria army chief wants presidential election in December

  • By law, elections come 90 days after an announcement, which would mean a December vote

ALGIERS: Algeria’s powerful army chief says that the date of the nation’s long-delayed presidential election should be announced on Sept. 15 to quickly pull the nation out of political limbo.
By law, elections come 90 days after an announcement, which would mean a December vote.
The official APS news agency quoted Ahmed Gaid Salah as saying on Monday that an independent body “for the preparation, organization and surveillance of the election” should be quickly installed.
The country has been without an elected leader since longtime President Abdelaziz Bouteflika was forced out in April, in part by a grassroots revolt that still holds weekly protests. Many in the vast protest movement seek a transition period toward democracy rather than a quick election, and worry over Gaid Salah’s growing role as behind-the-scenes powerbroker.


Turkey, Russia seal deal for Karabakh ‘peacekeeping center’

Updated 01 December 2020

Turkey, Russia seal deal for Karabakh ‘peacekeeping center’

  • The deal comes after days of talks between Turkish and Russian officials about how the two regional powers would jointly implement a Moscow-brokered cease-fire
  • Technical details for setting up the joint center were concluded and an agreement was signed

ANKARA: Turkey and Russia have agreed to monitor a truce over the disputed Nagorno-Karabakh region from a joint peacekeeping center, Ankara’s defense ministry said on Tuesday.
The deal comes after days of talks between Turkish and Russian officials about how the two regional powers would jointly implement a Moscow-brokered cease-fire signed this month between Armenia and Azerbaijan.
Technical details for setting up the joint center were concluded and an agreement was signed, the defense ministry said in a statement, adding that it would begin work “as soon as possible.”
Turkey is a staunch ally of Azerbaijan and has fervently defended its right to take back the Nagorno-Karabakh lands Baku lost to ethnic Armenian separatists in a 1988-94 war.
The truce deal ended more than six weeks of fighting that claimed more than 1,400 lives and saw ethnic Armenians agree to withdraw from large parts of the contested region of Azerbaijan.
The Turkish parliament voted this month to deploy a mission to “establish a joint center with Russia and to carry out the center’s activities.”
The deployment is set to last a year and its size will be determined by President Recep Tayyip Erdogan.
Russia has said repeatedly that Turkey will have no troops on the ground under the truce deal’s terms.