Oil prices rise on expectations of more OPEC output cuts

Pump jacks operate at sunset in an oil field in Midland, Texas. (REUTERS/Nick Oxford/File Photo)
Updated 09 August 2019

Oil prices rise on expectations of more OPEC output cuts

  • Saudi Arabia has said it planned to maintain its crude oil exports below 7 million barrels per day in August and September to bring the market back to balance and help absorb global oil inventories

SEOUL: Oil prices rose on Friday, supported by expectations of more production cuts by OPEC amid fears the US-China trade row could lead to a global slowdown, curbing demand for crude.
International benchmark Brent crude futures, were at $57.61 a barrel by 0009 GMT, up 23 cents, or 0.4%, from their previous settlement.
US West Texas Intermediate (WTI) futures were at $52.79 per barrel, up 25 cents, or 0.5%, from their last close.
Both contracts jumped more than 2% on Thursday to recover from January lows, buoyed by reports that Saudi Arabia, the world’s biggest oil exporter, had called other producers to discuss the recent slide in crude prices.
Oil prices have still lost more than 20% from their peaks reached in April, putting them in bear territory.
Global financial markets were rocked over the past week after US President Donald Trump said he would impose 10% tariffs on Chinese goods starting September and a fall in the Chinese yuan sparked fears of a currency war.
China’s yuan strengthened against the dollar on Thursday, on the back of strong export growth in July.
Saudi Arabia, de facto leader of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC), planned to maintain its crude oil exports below 7 million barrels per day in August and September to bring the market back to balance and help absorb global oil inventories, a Saudi oil official said on Wednesday.
“Saudi’s production in September will also be lower than it is currently. This helped crude oil rebound from its lowest level since January,” ANZ bank said in a note.
The United Arab Emirates also will continue to support actions to balance the oil market, the country’s energy minister Suhail Al-Mazrouei said in a tweet on Thursday.
The minister said the OPEC and non-OPEC ministerial monitoring committee would meet in Abu Dhabi on Sept. 12 to review the oil market.
OPEC and its allies including Russia agreed in July to extend their supply cuts until March 2020 to boost oil prices.


Britain expects ‘very significant’ week for Brexit talks as clock ticks down

Updated 29 November 2020

Britain expects ‘very significant’ week for Brexit talks as clock ticks down

  • Despite missing several self-imposed deadlines, the negotiations have failed to bridge differences on competition policy and the distribution of fishing rights
  • Britain’s transitional EU exit agreement expires on Dec. 31, and Britain says it will not seek any extension

LONDON: Britain and the European Union are heading into a “very significant” week, British foreign minister Dominic Raab said on Sunday, as talks over a trade deal enter their final days with serious differences yet to be resolved.
EU negotiator Michel Barnier told reporters in London that “works continue, even on Sunday” on his way to a negotiating session, as both sides look for a deal to prevent disruption to almost $1 trillion of trade at the end of December.
“This is a very significant week, the last real major week, subject to any further postponement... we’re down to really two basic issues,” Raab told the BBC.
Despite missing several self-imposed deadlines, the negotiations have failed to bridge differences on competition policy and the distribution of fishing rights.
But Britain’s transitional EU exit agreement — during which the bloc’s rules continue to apply — expires on Dec. 31, and Britain says it will not seek any extension. A deal would have to be ratified by both sides, leaving little time for new delay.
“The bottom line is... in the ordinary course of things we need to get a deal done over the next week or maybe another couple of days beyond that,” Raab told Times Radio in a separate interview.
Earlier, he had signalled some progress on the ‘level playing field’ provisions which look to ensure fair competition between Britain and the EU, and said fishing remained the most difficult issue to solve.
Despite accounting for 0.1% of the British economy, fishing rights have become a totemic issue for both sides. Britain has so far rejected EU proposals and remains adamant that as an independent nation it must have full control of its waters.
“The EU have just got to recognize the point of principle here,” Raab told Times Radio.