Where We Are Going Today: The Hot Spot, a spice fan’s dream in Jeddah

Updated 27 July 2019

Where We Are Going Today: The Hot Spot, a spice fan’s dream in Jeddah

For fans of spice, there is a shop in Jeddah dedicated to hot chili sauces from all over the world. 

From Tabasco and Sriracha sauce to rare brands high on the Scoville Heat Scale, the Hot Spot has options to suit all robust tastebuds.

They even have sauces from a company called Pain, which puts as much effort into creating discomfort as it does taste.

And not just salsas and hot sauces — they also sell snacks known for their heat, like fiery Takis chips and chili-coated peanuts.

The trend for the extra spicy sauces has caught on in the Kingdom because of the popular TV show “Hot Ones” where different celebrities eat hot sauce coated wings and try and endure the pain. 

The shop is located on Mohammed Saleh Nassif Road in Al-Safa district, Jeddah.


AlUla cultural and heritage site to reopen in October

Updated 02 June 2020

AlUla cultural and heritage site to reopen in October

  • Historic destination in northwest of Kingdom will now be accessible to visitors all year round

JEDDAH: When you’re already a quarter-of-a-million years old, a few months out of action because of a coronavirus pandemic is no more than a blip in time.

It is therefore safe to say that when visitors return to AlUla, the culture and heritage destination in northwest Saudi Arabia, not a lot will have changed.

AlUla’s attractions, including the Kingdom’s first UNESCO world heritage site, will reopen in October — and they will now be accessible all year round.

Walks, treks and trails will be available, guided by the local Rawi (Arabic storyteller) or self-guided, for visitors who want to delve deeper into the stories and customs of the region.

A visit to AlUla is a transformative experience to all who have visited — its vast open spaces, its secrets of civilizations gone by and the pure wonder of its landmarks.

“We are developing immersive, light-touch experiences that harness the power and silence of the landscapes, experiences like guided stargazing in a desert night sky that has inspired science, religion, philosophy, art and literature for millennia,” said Phillip Jones of the Royal Commission for AlUla.

Adventure tourists can tear around in a desert buggy or take to the skies in a vintage light aircraft to see volcanic craters and the lava fields of Harrat Khaybar. 

For families, Hijrat Noura, or Princess Noura Farm, offers a chance to observe the local flora and fauna. Winter Park, developed for the Winter at Tantora festival, will also return.

“A visit to AlUla is a transformative experience to all who have visited — its vast open spaces, its secrets of civilizations gone by and the pure wonder of its landmarks,” Jones said.