Dubai’s DIFC court orders Qatar’s beIN Sports to pay Saudi-based Selevision $8 million

The Dubai court found beIN SPORTS had been involved in serious legal irregularities, including breaches of its product distribution agreement and other licensing irregularities. (AFP/File Photo)
Updated 05 July 2019

Dubai’s DIFC court orders Qatar’s beIN Sports to pay Saudi-based Selevision $8 million

  • The court ruled the Qatari firm owed Selevision $8 million in compensation
  • It is the latest in a series of similar court decisions in the Arab world and across the globe against Qatar’s beIN Sport

JEDDAH/LONDON: Qatar-owned beIN Media Group is to pay more than SR30 million ($8 million) in compensation to the Saudi Selevision company after a ruling by the First Instance Court at the Dubai International Financial Center (DIFC). Arab News has received a copy of the court’s ruling.

The court rejected a lawsuit submitted by the beIN Media Group against Selevision, and ordered beIN media to pay compensation to Selevision of more than $7 million, in addition to the cost of arbitration of more than $600,000, as well as interest at an annual rate of 8 percent.

The beIN Sports group approached the court previously requesting the cancellation of an arbitration decision issued on June 5, 2018 at the London International Court of Arbitration at the DIFC, which ruled in favor of Selevision and ordered beIN Media Group to pay $7,356,01.22, in addition to arbitration costs of $692,002.66.

FAST FACTS

● The court ordered beIN media to pay compensation to Selevision of more than $7 million, in addition to the cost of arbitration, as well as interest.

● The ruling was issued as a result of the arbitration proceedings of the London International Court of Arbitration at the DIFC filed by Selevision.

The court’s ruling was issued as a result of the arbitration proceedings of the London International Court of Arbitration at the DIFC filed by Selevision against beIN Sports, which began on June 16, 2016. The two-day substantive session was held in Oman’s capital Muscat in September 2017.

As a result of the judgment of Judge Shamlan Al-Sawalhi in the Court of First Instance on June 20, 2019, beIN was ordered to pay compensation to Selevision within 30 days from the date of the judgment. The judge also annulled beIN’s motion to overturn the judgment.

Last month, the president of the Tribunal de Grande Instance de Paris court rejected beIN SPORTS allegations against the Arab Satellite Communications Organization (Arabsat), ordering that the media group pay fines of €6,000 ($6,770) to Arabsat’s adviser, as well as paying the prosecution costs of Arabsat (€25,000).

Welcoming the court’s decision, Arabsat said that it “greatly values and respects the integrity of the French judiciary, which has skillfully and professionally addressed the allegations of Qatar’s Al Jazeera subsidiary, beIN SPORTS.”


Lebanese journalist Roula Khalaf becomes first female editor of Financial Times

Updated 12 November 2019

Lebanese journalist Roula Khalaf becomes first female editor of Financial Times

  • Khalaf has served as deputy editor, foreign editor and Middle East editor during her more than two decades at FT
  • Khalaf will join Katharine Viner at the Guardian as one of the few women to edit major newspapers in Britain

LONDON: Lebanese journalist Roula Khalaf will become the first woman to edit the Financial Times in its 131-year history after Lionel Barber, Britain’s most senior financial journalist, said he would step down.
Barber said on Tuesday he would leave in January after 14 years as editor and 34 years at the Nikkei-owned newspaper, which had one million paying readers in 2019, with digital subscribers accounting for more than 75% of total circulation.
Khalaf has served as deputy editor, foreign editor and Middle East editor during her more than two decades at the salmon-pink FT and in recent years has sought to increase diversity in the newsroom and attract more female readers, while also becoming the publication’s first Arab editor.
“It’s a great honor to be appointed editor of the FT, the greatest news organization in the world.
“I look forward to building on Lionel Barber’s extraordinary achievements,” said Khalaf, whose earlier writing for Forbes magazine had earned her a small role in Martin Scorsese’s The Wolf of Wall Street.
Her article described the leading character Jordan Belfort as sounding like a twisted version of Robin Hood who takes from the rich and gives to himself and his merry band of brokers.
Khalaf will join Katharine Viner at the Guardian as one of the few women to edit major newspapers in Britain and one of few leading female editors in the world after Jill Abramson left the New York Times.
Before joining the FT in 1995, Khalaf worked at Forbes in New York and earned a master’s at Columbia University and graduated from Syracuse University.
Tsuneo Kita, chairman of Japan’s Nikkei which bought the FT from Pearson in 2015, said in a statement Khalaf was chosen for her sound judgment and integrity.
“We look forward to working closely with her to deepen our global media alliance.”
Nikkei’s Kita described Barber as a strategic thinker and true internationalist, adding he was very sad to see him leave.
“However, both of us agree it is time to open a new chapter,” he said.
During his time as editor, Barber engineered a successful push into online subscription that protected the title as others battled an unprecedented collapse in advertising revenue, as well as managing the move to a new owner.