India makes e-visas available to Saudi nationals

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This photo taken on January 8, 2018 shows an Indian women picking tea leaves at a tea plantation near Munnar in the state of Kerala. (AFP)
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A plane is seen at the taxiway after landing at Kochi's International airport in the Indian state of Kerala on August 29, 2018. (AFP)
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Dr. Ausaf Sayeed, Indian ambassador to Saudi Arabia. (Supplied)
Updated 18 June 2019

India makes e-visas available to Saudi nationals

  • All applicants will need are valid identification documents, like passports, and a debit or credit card with which to pay the e-visa fee

RIYADH: The Indian government has made e-visas available for Saudi nationals in an effort to ease travel and increase the number of Saudi visitors to the country, it said on Monday.
India’s Ambassador to Saudi Arabia Dr. Ausaf Sayeed told Arab News “I am happy to announce that the e-visa facility is now available to Saudi nationals, and all related agencies have been informed. Saudi nationals can apply for the visa online from the comfort of their homes or from anywhere in the world.”
E-visa application confirmations will be filed within a 24-hour period of submission, approval granted within 72 hours, and the visa will be valid for one year.
All applicants will need are valid identification documents, like passports, and a debit or credit card with which to pay the e-visa fee.
The e-visa will then be sent via email, and can be used digitally or printed. The e-visas are issued for a period of one year with multiple entries and each stay is valid up to 90 days, the ambassador said.
Sayeed added that applicants could opt for tourist, business or medical visas via the new system, which will render the current biometric visa system redundant.
The decision comes following the visit by India’s Prime Minister Narendra Modi to Riyadh in April 2016 and Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman’s trip to New Delhi in February this year.
India launched e-visa facilities for 43 countries in November 2014 to simplify the process of obtaining a visa to the country, and to promote it as a tourist destination.


‘Juhayman: 40 years on:’ Arab News takes a Deep Dive into Saudi history with a multimedia look at the siege of Makkah's Grand Mosque

Updated 1 min 44 sec ago

‘Juhayman: 40 years on:’ Arab News takes a Deep Dive into Saudi history with a multimedia look at the siege of Makkah's Grand Mosque

  • Featuring interviews with key players such as Prince Turki Al-Faisal, Saudi Arabia’s English-language newspaper tells the full story of the unthinkable event that cast a shadow over its society for decades
  • As part of its Deep Dive series online, featuring documentary-style multimedia stories, Arab News looks back at this event in a way no Saudi publication has done before

Forty years ago this week, on Nov. 20, 1979, a group of militants did the unthinkable: They seized the Grand Mosque in Makkah, taking people hostage inside in a two-week standoff with Saudi forces.

Until recently, the crisis remained too painful for Saudis to examine fully for almost four decades. Now Arab News, Saudi Arabia’s leading English-language daily, is looking back at the event in a way that no publication in the Kingdom has done before: with a multimedia Deep Dive story online at arabnews.com/juhayman-40-years-on.

“The 1979 attack on Makkah’s  Grand Mosque halted major social development in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, negatively affecting a progressing nation for generations to come,” said Rawan Radwan, the lead reporter on the project, who is based in Jeddah. “At Arab News, we delved deep into the matter to uncover the story of Juhayman, the terrorist who seized the holiest site and shook the Islamic world. It’s a story that for many years struck fear in the hearts of the Saudi people, yet has not been covered in such depth in local or international media — until now.”

Arab News launched its Deep Dive series earlier this year as an engaging new way to showcase its in-depth storytelling on key topics, enlivened by audio, video and animated graphics. Its first story was an in-depth account of the space mission by the first Arab astronaut, Saudi Prince Sultan bin Salman; the siege of Makkah is another story from the Kingdom’s past that it chose to revisit.

Extensive research was conducted over two months in several cities, including Makkah itself, and involved teams in five of Arab News’ bureaus: Jeddah, Riyadh, Dubai, London and Beirut. The team interviewed key players such as Prince Turki Al-Faisal, then head of the General Intelligence Directorate, and re-created what happened in a series of interactive maps.

 

Juhayman: 40 years on
On the anniversary of the 1979 attack on Makkah's Grand Mosque, Arab News tells the full story of an unthinkable event that shocked the Islamic world and cast a shadow over Saudi society for decades
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