Saudi General Entertainment Authority investigates claims of Kingdom’s ‘first nightclub’ 

A view of the Addmind Hospitality Group's White club in Dubai. The company was reported be seeking to put up a similar club in Jeddah. (Supplied photo)
Updated 14 June 2019

Saudi General Entertainment Authority investigates claims of Kingdom’s ‘first nightclub’ 

JEDDAH: The Saudi General Entertainment Authority (GEA) has announced an official probe into an event which took place in the coastal city of Jeddah. 

The investigation was launched after social media videos of the event sparked controversy and raised questions over the nature of the event and the venue. Many social media users, and some regional media outlets, have labeled the event as an opening of a famous nightclub; albeit always insisting that it was not going to serve alcohol. 

In a statement posted on its Twitter account, the Saudi government body announced that: “According to information provided to the GEA, the event (Project X) is in violation of the legal procedures and regulations in force, and has not been authorised by the body," the statement said.

GEA had "originally issued a licence for another event", the statement said. "Its contractor then took advantage of an extension of that licence to commit these serious and unacceptable violations."

 

 


The Hajjana: heritage of Saudi Arabia’s camel riding border patrol honored

Updated 30 October 2020

The Hajjana: heritage of Saudi Arabia’s camel riding border patrol honored

The Hajjana — fearless camel riders who patrolled the Kingdom’s borders — helped pave the way for the establishment of the modern Saudi state.
Their story goes back almost 90 years when a Hajjana border patrol was established during the reign of King Abdul Aziz in 1933.
After the Kingdom’s founder reclaimed Al-Ahsa, he ordered sea and land patrols to be carried out to tighten security in the region’s border areas.
Patrols were led by camel riders, so a military sector was formed at that time known as Hajjana. Its name was derived from their means of transport — camels.
Now, nine decades later, the Camel Club has established the Royal Hajjana to commemorate the group’s distinguished cultural heritage.
Since its creation in April, the Royal Hajjana has been preparing to take part in official reception ceremonies for King Salman and Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman’s guests as well as national festivals sponsored by the king and crown prince.
It will also perform in Saudi heritage shows and represent the Kingdom in local and international camel festivals.
Hajjana officers became famous throughout the country after acquiring their name from the “hejin,” or camel. They protected the Kingdom’s residents from the south of the Empty Quarter to north of the Nafud Desert.
One of the founding king’s priorities was to provide security and protect the nation’s borders, so the Border Guard was among the first military sectors created.
The Coast Guard’s budget also included allocations for Hajjana officers, known as the Hajjana patrol commanders, whose role was part of the Frontier Corps.
Patrols continued to operate in southern regions until recently. However, the memory of the Hajjana remains fresh in the minds of the Kingdom’s border guards.