Fake News Watch: Saudi airports and Egyptian rumors

Saudi Arabia’s Civil Aviation Authority has denied social media rumors that the project to establish Al-Qunfudah airport has been canceled. (Supplied)
Updated 20 May 2019

Fake News Watch: Saudi airports and Egyptian rumors

A weekly round-up of bogus reports and phony facts in the mainstream and social media.

1. Al-Qunfudah airfield works still ongoing
Saudi Arabia’s Civil Aviation Authority has denied social media rumors that the project to establish Al-Qunfudah airport has been canceled, Sabq reported.
The authority’s spokesperson told the Saudi newspaper that the airport project “is ongoing, and is currently in the technical procedures phase, to complete the measures for appointing the project’s supervision consultant.”
Al-Qunfudah, in the Makkah region, will be Saudi Arabia’s 28th airport.

2. Egypt rumors put to rest
A security source in Egypt’s governorate of Sharqia has denied rumors of finding the body of a child “slaughtered” in what was feared to be part of an organ-trade ring.
The source, quoted in a report by news website Masrawy, said such fake news spreads fear among residents.
A number of news websites had showed a picture of a 13-year-old child, claiming he was found “slaughtered” and that “his organs were taken away.”
Measures will be taken against those who promoted such news on social media, the security source added.


Turkey imposes advertising ban on Twitter, Periscope, Pinterest

Updated 19 January 2021

Turkey imposes advertising ban on Twitter, Periscope, Pinterest

  • Decisions in Official Gazette say the advertising bans went into effect from Tuesday

ISTANBUL: Turkey’s Information and Communication Technologies Authority has imposed advertising bans on Twitter, Periscope and Pinterest under a new social media law, according to decisions published in the country’s Official Gazette on Tuesday.
The law, which critics say will muzzle dissent, requires social media companies to appoint local representatives in Turkey. On Monday, Facebook joined other companies in saying it would be appointing such a representative.
YouTube, owned by Alphabet Inc’s Google, said a month ago it had decided to appoint a representative.
The decisions in the Official Gazette said the advertising bans went into effect from Tuesday. Twitter, its live-streaming app Periscope, and image sharing app Pinterest were not immediately available to comment.
The law allows authorities to remove content from platforms, rather than blocking access as they did in the past. The move has caused concern as people turn more to online platforms after Ankara tightened its grip on mainstream media.
In previous months Facebook, YouTube and Twitter had faced fines in Turkey for not complying with the law. Companies that do not follow the law will ultimately have their bandwidth slashed by 90 percent, essentially blocking access.