GCC countries work to ensure good oil supply

An aerial view of a tanker ship park at sea. A crude oil tanker and LPG tanker are loading at sunset. (Shutterstock)
Updated 20 May 2019

GCC countries work to ensure good oil supply

  • OPEC indicates it is likely to maintain production cuts despite regional tensions

KUWAIT CITY/LONDON: Kuwait’s deputy foreign minister said countries in the Gulf have strengthened coordination to provide oil to global markets amid increased regional tensions.
“It is normal amid this escalation that Kuwait and the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries take these steps,” Khalid Al-Jarallah told reporters.
“There is cooperation and coordination between Kuwait and the Gulf countries to provide guarantees for oil tankers and continuous supply of energy to global markets.”
Jarallah’s comments come days after “sabotage” attacks against tankers in highly sensitive Gulf waters and the bombing of a Saudi pipeline — the latter claimed by Iran-aligned Yemeni rebels.
Both attacks targeted routes built as alternatives to the Strait of Hormuz, the conduit for almost all Gulf exports.

UAE Energy Minister Suhail Al-Mazrouei said oil producers are able to fill any market gaps.

Kuwait’s deputy foreign minister said “tension was escalating quickly” but he remained hopeful. He added Kuwait was in “constant contact” with its ally, the US.
Oil prices were steady on Monday as OPEC indicated it was likely to maintain production cuts that have helped boost prices this year.
Brent crude was up by 21 cents at $72.42 a barrel by 1:52 p.m. GMT, having earlier touched $73.40, the highest since April 26.
Saudi Energy Minister Khalid Al-Falih said on Sunday there was consensus among the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and allied oil producers to drive down crude inventories “gently” but he would remain responsive to the needs of a “fragile market.”
UAE Energy Minister Suhail Al-Mazrouei earlier told reporters that producers were capable of filling any market gap and that relaxing supply cuts was not the right decision.

 

OPEC data indicates oil inventories in the developed world rose by 3.3 million barrels month-on-month in March, and were 22.8 million barrels above their five-year average.
A gathering of the so-called Joint Ministerial Monitoring Committee (JMMC) in Saudi Arabia over the weekend did not make any solid recommendations, leaving a decision on policy for a meeting of OPEC and its allies next month in Vienna.
“While not explicitly mentioned in the statement (of the JMMC), uncertainty on how many Iranian and Venezuelan oil barrels will be lost due to US sanctions was probably the main reason the group kicked the can down the road,” UBS analyst Giovanni Staunovo said.
OPEC, Russia and other non-member producers, an alliance known as OPEC+, agreed to cut output by 1.2 million barrels per day (bpd) from Jan. 1 for six months to try to prevent inventories from increasing and weakening prices.

FASTFACTS

BACKGROUND

OPEC, Russia and other non-member producers, an alliance known as OPEC+, agreed to cut output by 1.2 million barrels per day (bpd) from Jan. 1 for six months to try to prevent inventories from increasing and weakening prices.


KSE-100 remains bullish after IMF mission recommended second tranche for Pakistan

Updated 11 November 2019

KSE-100 remains bullish after IMF mission recommended second tranche for Pakistan

  • Statistics show the stock market has given a return of 14.10 percent since July 1
  • Analysts believe Pakistan’s external position is comfortable now

KARACHI: Pakistan’s KSE-100 index continued its bullish steak for eighth consecutive sessions as it surged by 2.24 percent on Monday, witnessing a spike of 825 points, in the wake of the recommendation issued by the International Monetary Fund’s Pakistan mission to release the second tranche of $450 million for the South Asian country that is still grappling with economic challenges.
The longest bullish spell in a year was witnessed at the Pakistan bourse following “easing political noise, MSCI emerging market status quo and IMF affirmations over the achievement of First Quarter Performance Criteria by good margins,” Ahsan Mehanti, senior equity analyst, commented.
After the first review of the overall economic performance of the country under the IMF’s $6 billion bailout program, the Fund on Friday declared that the Pakistani authorities had met all performance criteria with comfortable margins.
Following the performance review, Pakistan and the IMF reached a staff-level agreement that paved the way for the second tranche of $450 million that the country expects in December this year.
Analysts say that amid the bullish spell, the equity market’s benchmark KSE 100 Index has witnessed a surge of about 7000 points from its lows. They add that the stock market has given a return of 14.10 percent since July 1.
“The external position of Pakistan seems comfortable now. The political tension has also defused, national saving scheme (NSS) rate cut and IMF review have played a vital role in putting the market on an upward trajectory,” Samiullah Tariq, Director Research at Arif Habib Limited, told Arab News.
On Monday, the market volumes increased from 210.6 million to 283 million shares, contributed mostly by banks, cement firms and the technology sector.
Pakistan’s capital markets are said to be attractive for foreign investors who had spent $675 million in treasury bills (T-Bills) and $3 million in Pakistan Investment Bonds (PIBs) by November 11, 2018.
However, the equity market witnessed outflows of $30 million since July 2019, according to the State Bank of Pakistan (SBP) and AHL Research.
During the past eight sessions, the domestic equity bourse rose by 9 percent or 3,042 points.
Previously, the market had exhibited such a trend on November 2, 2018, when it shot up by 11.4 percent or 4,289 points.