Egypt’s Pyramids FC donates 10 million pounds for train crash victims 

Fire fighters and onlookers gather at the scene of a fiery train crash at the Egyptian capital Cairo's main railway station on February 27, 2019. (AFP)
Updated 04 March 2019
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Egypt’s Pyramids FC donates 10 million pounds for train crash victims 

  • The crash, which left 22 people dead and dozens injured, took place in Cairo's Ramses Station Feb. 27

CAIRO: Egyptian football club Pyramids FC announced a 10 million Egyptian pound donation for the victims of a deadly train crash that hit Egypt last week. 

In a statement issued on Sunday, the club said its owner, Saudi investor Turki Al-Sheikh, had donated the amount to the families. 

The statement said Al-Sheikh and the board of directors aimed to offer a helping hand for the families and alleviate the suffering of those injured.

The crash, which left 22 people dead and dozens injured, took place in Cairo's Ramses Station Feb. 27.

A train, with no driver on board, was seen moving at an extremely high speed and crashing into the platform’s buffer stop. 

A large number of citizens were rushed into hospitals where the victims were being treated to donate blood in the aftermath of the crash. 

Other reports also claimed that Egyptian Star Mohamed Mounir will be donating a percentage of his recent concert profits to the Ahl Masr Foundation and the Egyptian Blood Bank, which have been supporting the incident’s victims since then. 


Thousands return to government-seized areas in northwest Syria: state media

Updated 15 September 2019
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Thousands return to government-seized areas in northwest Syria: state media

  • The Syrian Observatory reported “around 3,000 people” going home from other areas under regime control
  • The Idlib region is one of the last holdouts of opposition forces

DAMASCUS: Thousands have returned to their hometowns in northwest Syria after military advances by government loyalist against militants and allied rebels, state media said Sunday.
“Thousands of citizens return to their villages and towns of the northern Hama countryside and the southern Idlib countryside,” state news agency SANA said.
The Syrian Observatory for Human Rights, a Britain-based monitor, reported “around 3,000 people” going home from other areas under regime control.
Since August 31, a cease-fire announced by regime backer Russia has largely held in northwestern Syria, though the Observatory has reported sporadic bombardment.
SANA said the returns came amid “government efforts to return the displaced to their towns and villages.”
The Idlib region of around three million people, many of them dispaced by fighting in other areas, is one of the last holdouts of opposition to forces backing Syrian President Bashar Assad.
Moscow announced the cease-fire late last month after four months of deadly violence that displaced 400,000 people, most of whom fled north within the jihadist-run bastion, according to the United Nations.
Regime forces had chipped away at the southern edges of the jihadist-run stronghold throughout August, retaking towns and villages in the north of Hama province and the south of Idlib province.
Syria’s civil war has killed more than 370,000 people since it started in 2011 with the repression of anti-government protests.
Assad’s regime now controls more than 60 percent of the country after notching up a series of victories against rebels and jihadists with key Russian backing since 2015.
But a large chunk of Idlib, fully administered by Syria’s former Al-Qaeda affiliate since January, as well as a Kurdish-held swathe of the oil-rich northeast, remain beyond its reach.