Where We Are Going Today: Nippon Sayko, A slice of Japan in Jeddah

Updated 17 January 2019

Where We Are Going Today: Nippon Sayko, A slice of Japan in Jeddah

  • The store stocks everything from retro collections of anime figurines and merchandise from “Rose of Versailles”

For fans of Japanese pop culture, from anime and manga to action figures and comic books, Jeddah’s Nippon Sayko is a treasure trove.

The Red Sea Mall-based shop stocks everything from retro collections of anime figurines and merchandise from “Rose of Versailles” and “Treasure Island,” to 90s cult hits like “Detective Conan,” “Hunter X Hunter” and “Neon Genesis Evangelion.” Best-selling modern manga and anime series like “Attack on Titan,” “One-Punch Man” and “Tokyo Ghoul” also feature heavily.

Nippon Sayko not only focuses on anime collectibles, though, but also caters to the Kingdom’s K-pop fanbase, with T-shirts, posters and keyrings from all of Korea’s most popular artists on sale.

If Asian pop-culture is not your thing, though, the store also sells Japanese and Korean food, from savory delicacies to snacks and sweets, as well as other staple products, such as tea sets, Kimonos (Japanese traditional robes) and Korean Hanbok dresses.


What We Are Reading Today: First Things by Hadley Arkes

Updated 03 July 2020

What We Are Reading Today: First Things by Hadley Arkes

This book restores to us an understanding that was once settled in the “moral sciences:” That there are propositions, in morals and law, which are not only true but which cannot be otherwise. 

It was understood in the past that, in morals or in mathematics, our knowledge begins with certain axioms that must hold true of necessity; that the principles drawn from these axioms hold true universally, unaffected by variations in local “cultures;” and that the presence of these axioms makes it possible to have, in the domain of morals, some right answers. Hadley Arkes restates the grounds of that older understanding and unfolds its implications for the most vexing political problems of our day.

The author turns first to the classic debate between Abraham Lincoln and Stephen Douglas. After establishing the groundwork and properties of moral propositions, he traces their application in such issues as selective conscientious objection, justifications for war, the war in Vietnam, a nation’s obligation to intervene abroad, the notion of supererogatory acts, the claims of “privacy,” and the problem of abortion.