Nepal probes ‘Buddha boy’ over devotee disappearances

‘Buddha Boy’ Ram Bahadur Bomjan, seen here in 2008, became famous after followers said he could meditate motionless for months without water, food or sleep. (AFP)
Updated 07 January 2019

Nepal probes ‘Buddha boy’ over devotee disappearances

  • ‘The police have started investigating these complaints against Bomjan,’ a spokesman for Nepal’s Central Investigation Bureau said
  • Thousands of worshippers queue for days to witness his so-called miracles of meditation deep in the jungle

KATMANDU: A Nepali spiritual leader believed by his followers to be a reincarnation of Buddha is under investigation over the disappearance of several devotees, police in Katmandu said Monday.
Ram Bahadur Bomjan, dubbed “Buddha Boy,” became famous in 2005 after followers said he could meditate motionless for months without water, food or sleep in Nepal’s jungles.
The 28-year-old guru has a devout following but has been accused of physically and sexually assaulting some of his flock.
Special police investigators have begun inquiries after the families of four of Bomjan’s devotees allegedly vanished from his ashrams.
“The police have started investigating these complaints against Bomjan,” Uma Prasad Chaturbedi, a spokesman for Nepal’s Central Investigation Bureau, said.
“The investigation is in preliminary stage and we cannot share many details.”
Bomjan has long been dogged by accusations of abuse in deeply spiritual Nepal, even as thousands of worshippers queued for days to witness his so-called miracles of meditation deep in the jungle.
In September last year, an 18-year-old nun accused the guru of raping her at one of his ashrams.
Dozens more have filed complaints against him alleging assault. The self-styled godman said he beat them for disturbing his meditation.
The Bodhi Shrawan Dharma Sangha, an organization associated with the guru, recently slammed as baseless a series of fresh allegations made by a local website, Setopati.com, which published reports detailing cases of disappearances, sexual assault and violence in his ashrams.


American air strike kills five Taliban fighters: US official

Updated 56 min 22 sec ago

American air strike kills five Taliban fighters: US official

  • Violence has escalated in recent weeks with clashes taking place between the insurgents and government troops across the country
KABUL: A US air strike launched to support Afghan security forces killed five Taliban fighters in central Afghanistan on Sunday evening, a spokesman for US forces in Afghanistan said.
Violence has escalated in recent weeks with clashes taking place between the insurgents and government troops across the country, while negotiators from both sides have held talks in Qatar for a peace deal that could allow Washington to withdraw its remaining forces and end the United States’ longest war. Col. Sonny Leggett, the US military spokesman in Kabul, said the air strike in Wardak province was conducted to defend Afghan government troops and targeted Taliban fighters, killing five.
He said the action was in accordance with terms of the United States withdrawal agreement struck with the Taliban in February.
“We reject the allegations of violating the agreement and of killing innocent Afghans,” Leggett said, without elaborating.
When asked for comment, a Taliban spokesman said that there had been no fighting when the strike took place, and it broke the terms of agreement.
“This attack is a violation of the agreement and we condemn it,” spokesman Zabihullah Mujahid said.
Earlier this month, the Taliban accused the United States of violating the agreement following air strikes in southern Helmand province, where government forces were desperately trying to repel hundreds of insurgents seeking to seize control of the provincial capital Laskhar Gah.
Diplomats and officials say the rising violence is undermining trust needed if the talks in Qatar are to succeed.
The United States’ special envoy Zalmay Khalilzad said earlier this month that he had met with Taliban representatives to agree to a ‘re-set’ of the US-Taliban deal in order to reduce the violence.
The Taliban has so far rejected repeated calls for a cease-fire by foreign powers and the Afghan government.