Meghan presents fashion award to wedding dress designer Waight Keller

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Givency's British fashion designer Clare Waight Keller poses with her award for British designer of the year Womenswear during the British Fashion Awards 2018 in London on December 10, 2018. (AFP)
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In this May 19, 2018, file photo, Meghan Markle leaves with Prince Harry after their wedding ceremony, at St. George's Chapel in Windsor Castle in Windsor, near London, England. (AP)
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In this May 19, 2018, file photo, Britain's Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex and his wife Meghan Markle, Duchess of Sussex wave from the Ascot Landau Carriage during their carriage procession on Castle Hill outside Windsor Castle in Windsor, England after their wedding ceremony. (AP)
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Prince Harry and Meghan Markle leave St George's Chapel at Windsor Castle after their wedding. Saturday May 19, 2018. (REUTERS)
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Givency's British fashion designer Clare Waight Keller poses with her award for British designer of the year Womenswear during the British Fashion Awards 2018 in London on December 10, 2018. (AFP)
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Givency's British fashion designer Clare Waight Keller poses with her award for British designer of the year Womenswear during the British Fashion Awards 2018 in London on December 10, 2018. (AFP)
Updated 11 December 2018

Meghan presents fashion award to wedding dress designer Waight Keller

  • The two women met in early 2018, before the designer created the dress worn by Meghan for her wedding to Harry on May 19
  • The British Fashion Awards recognized Vivienne Westwood, winner of the award for positive change, for her commitment to the environment

LONDON: Givenchy’s artistic director Clare Waight Keller Monday received the British designer of the year womenswear award from Meghan Markle, whose dress she designed for her wedding to Prince Harry.
“It is such a pleasure to be here celebrating British fashion,” Meghan, the Duchess of Sussex, said at the star-studded annual Fashion Awards at the Albert Hall.
The former US actress, who is pregnant, praised the “vision,” “creativity” and also “the incredible kindness” of Waight Keller.
The two women met in early 2018, before the designer created the dress worn by Meghan for her wedding to Harry on May 19.
The British Fashion Awards also recognized Vivienne Westwood, winner of the award for positive change, for her commitment to the environment.
The 77-old high priestess of punk took the opportunity to denounce the “rotten financial system” which the dame said was “the cause of all our problems.”
A long-time political campaigner, she also took aim at French President Emmanuel Macron who recently canceled fuel tax increases in the face of the “yellow vest” protests.
“This tax hurts the poor more than anybody,” Westwood said, adding “he’s not thinking that he has already given all these tax breaks to the rich people. So of course everybody is going to be annoyed.”
The model of the year award went to 17-year-old Kaia Gerber, following in the footsteps of her mother, former supermodel Cindy Crawford.
“It’s such an honor,” said the young American, on the verge of tears. “I have just a small role in making a creative vision come to life but I’m so beyond grateful to be a part of it.”
Among the other awards, Italian fashion house Gucci was named brand of the year and Italian Pierpaolo Piccioli, artistic director of Valentino, won the best designer award.


You’ve got mail: Writer of mystery letters in Jeddah revealed

Updated 02 April 2020

You’ve got mail: Writer of mystery letters in Jeddah revealed

  • She leaves notes all over Jeddah to be picked up by strangers

JEDDAH: Ever wondered what it is like to find an uplifting letter from a stranger? If you are in Jeddah, then you are in luck as you might pass by and pick up a letter in a public area titled: “If you find me, I’m yours.”

These random acts of kindness were devised by an initiative called Garba’at Rasayl, Hejazi slang for “a mess of letters.” The group was created by 23-year-old Saudi freelance graphic designer Hadeel Felemban.

The simple white envelopes are covered in stickers and magazine cutouts. Felemban said letter-writing helps her express her thoughts and feelings while sharing it with the world, one letter at a time.

“Mess happens every time I write paper letters, a mess of words and feelings, a mess of scraps and colors used to decorate the envelope,” she told Arab News.

The act of writing letters is special to her as it brings a sense of connection to her father — who worked at the Saudi Post Office more than 20 years ago — and revives the exchange of letters in a world filled with technology. The initiative holds monthly meetings in different cities, where attendees gather to write letters to strangers.

“My father passed away when I was two, and the only way I knew him was through the stories my mother and his brothers share about him. I would write to him on my phone’s notepad sometimes, but I wanted something other than our names to connect us.”

The discovery of her late father’s stamp collection from different periods in her home two years ago prompted her to start the initiative.

“It was like finding a treasure. And ever since then, I’ve been looking for ways to reuse them and revive paper mail. I realized that in a period different than his, I became a mail carrier just like him.”

Felemban shared her interest in sending traditional mail on Instagram. She was able to send letters to some who responded, but she did not receive any in return.

“The waiting was suffocating, I felt devastated and I blame that we are not used to the mailing system and its hardship,” she said.

One night, she decided to write a letter and leave the envelopes in public places.

“Writing a letter to a stranger is probably the best solution to killing the unknown wait from the other party.”

She decorated the envelope of the message, and left it in a cafe in Jeddah without any contact information. “Then I found myself monitoring the cafe’s account on social media, and was disappointed yet again. I didn’t know what had happened to the letter, was it thrown away, picked up or neglected?”

In a family gathering in early October, Felemban placed her stationery supplies and envelopes on the dining table, ready to write a new letter. Her cousins and mother were curious and joined her.

“I was so happy to include them. I complained to them about the waiting and not knowing if the letter was abandoned.”

Her family members suggested creating a special tag for the letters so that strangers who received the letters could reach out to her.

“I created the Arabic hashtag for ‘mess of letters’ and created a post for my friends in Riyadh — where I was at the time — and asked them if they wanted to gather to write letters together. I received a lot of positive responses and then prepared for the event in one of the cafes in the city.”

She hosted the first gathering on Oct. 25 and was happy to see how the simple gesture of uplifting messages had an impact on her community.

“During exam week back when I was studying, it was such a mentally exhausting time, and I used to write encouraging words and quotes for myself and the visitors of the cafe I usually go to. I noticed they had a great impact on emotional well-being. I held on to that idea by writing letters to strangers in public places.”

This simple act of kindness from one stranger to another can go a long way toward making a difference in someone’s life.