The Six: World-famous authors at Emirates Literature Festival

The Emirates Literature Festival is set to run from March 1-9, 2019. (Shutterstock)
Updated 21 November 2018

The Six: World-famous authors at Emirates Literature Festival

DUBAI: Set to run from March 1-9, 2019, the festival boats a stellar lineup of authors, including these famous faces.

Ian Rankin
Ian Rankin is best known for his “Inspector Rebus” detective series, the 22nd of which, “In a House of Lies,” was published in 2018. He is set to speak on stage on March 8 and 9.

Jane Hawking
Stephen Hawking’s wife for more than twenty years, Jane Hawking is a writer and lecturer. Her 2002 memoir, “Traveling to Infinity,” was turned into the critically-acclaimed 2015 movie, “The Theory of Everything.”

Frank Gardner
The renowned British correspondent was appointed an Officer of the Order of the British Empire for his services to journalism in 2005 and is set to give a talk on March 9.

Zeina Hashem Beck
The Lebanese poet’s most recent collection, “Louder than Hearts,” won the 2016 May Sarton New Hampshire Poetry Prize.

Aziz Mohammed
The Saudi writer and poet published his debut novel, “The Critical Case of ‘K’,” in 2017 and it was shortlisted for the International Prize for the Arabic Fiction in 2018.

Dubai Abulhoul Alfalasi
The author of “Galagolia,” the first Emirati fantasy novel in English, she is currently writing a series of children’s books on Emirati folklore.

 


What We Are Reading Today: Dostoevsky: The Seeds of Revolt, 1821-1849 by Joseph Frank

Updated 03 April 2020

What We Are Reading Today: Dostoevsky: The Seeds of Revolt, 1821-1849 by Joseph Frank

The term “biography” seems insufficiently capacious to describe the singular achievement of Joseph Frank’s five-volume study of the life of the great Russian novelist Fyodor Dostoevsky. One critic, writing upon the publication of the final volume, casually tagged the series as the ultimate work on Dostoevsky “in any language, and quite possibly forever.”

Frank himself had not originally intended to undertake such a massive work. The endeavor began in the early 1960s as an exploration of Dostoevsky’s fiction, but it later became apparent to Frank that a deeper appreciation of the fiction would require a more ambitious engagement with the writer’s life, directly caught up as Dostoevsky was with the cultural and political movements of mid- and late-19th-century Russia. Already in his forties, Frank undertook to learn Russian and embarked on what would become a five-volume work comprising more than 2,500 pages. The result is an intellectual history of 19th-century Russia, with Dostoevsky’s mind as a refracting prism.

The volumes have won numerous prizes, among them the National Book Critics Circle Award for Biography, the Christian Gauss Award of Phi Beta Kappa, the Los Angeles Times Book Prize, and the James Russell Lowell Prize of the Modern Language Association.

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