Highlights: ‘The Saudi Gallery’ at MISK Art 2018

Abdulhalim Radwi - Happiness. (Supplied)
Updated 12 November 2018

Highlights: ‘The Saudi Gallery’ at MISK Art 2018

  • Misk Art Week was held at Durrat Arriyadh from Oct. 30 to Nov. 3
  • More than 40 pioneering Saudi artists have been honored for their role in developing the Kingdom’s arts movement as part of Misk Art Week

DUBAI: A selection of work from the contemporary Saudi Arabian art fair

Abdulhalim Radwi
No retrospective of contemporary Saudi Arabian art would be complete without work from Abdulhalim Radwi. His 1965 exhibition is often credited as the origin of the modern art movement in Saudi Arabia (some historians go even further back, to his 1953 school artwork exhibition) and ushered in a decade or so where most notable Saudi artists were able to stage a solo exhibition of their own, and so became known not only to the public, but to each other, thus helping to establish some kind of collective movement.
Radwi was also one of the first Saudi artists to travel overseas to further his art education — he held a BA degree from the Academy of Fine Arts in Rome. But he remained resolutely connected to his roots and many of his paintings were about life in the Kingdom.
So it makes perfect sense that his work would be prominently featured in “The Saudi Gallery,” the modern art fair — curated by Athr Gallery and featuring work from eight Saudi galleries — that ran in correlation with MISK Art 2018, which took place last week. Pictured here are two of his pieces that formed part of the fair, “Palestine” and “Happiness.”

Abdulrahman Al-Sulaiman
Dammam-based artist Abdulrahman Al-Sulaiman, born in Al Ehsa’ in 1954, is one of Saudi Arabia’s most-respected modern artists. He rose to prominence in the 1980s and has been at the forefront of the Kingdom’s contemporary art scene ever since. Al-Sulaiman is a skillful user of subtle contrasts of color and shade and his intricate, ornamental work is often influenced by local culture and literature.

Basmah Felemban
Born in Jeddah in 1993, Basham Felemban she brings a deep knowledge of and affection for Islamic art to her work, but also told Arab News in 2015 that she found inspiration all around her. “I think it’s about being open to learning about everything,” she said. “Inspiration is made of small bits that you collect every day. Once you stop seeking knowledge, you stop getting inspiration. We need to learn to see the truth in things around us so we can learn the truth in ourselves.” Her 2017 work “The Journey in God by God” (shown here) was on display in “The Saudi Gallery.”

Nasser Al-Turki
The Riyadh-based Nasser Al-Turki is a self-taught artist who only began creating work in his twenties. He is now a prominent member of the Riyadh art movement, which includes peers such as Mohammad Farea. Even now, however, art remains a hobby rather than a career for Al-Turki, who works for Saudi Telecom. He has described his creative process as being akin to “deep meditation” in which he is inspired to mix bold colors to create a sense of happiness in the viewer.

Jassim Al-Dhamin
Al-Dhamin was born on Tarout Island in 1988. He is part of the Qatif Artists Group. His award-winning work is inspired by his passion for colors and he has been painting since his early childhood. His 2017 work “A Love Bullet” was on display at “The Saudi Gallery.” Writing about the piece on Facebook, Al-Dhamin said, “When you’re weak, you cling to anything that gives you strength.”

Taha Sabban
The Makkah-born Sabban is a friend and follower of Abdulhalim Radwi and has said he will “always be in debt” to his mentor for his advice and support. Radwi included Sabban’s early work in one of the first exhibitions at the Jeddah Center of Fine Arts — something Sabban says gave him great confidence in his own ability as an artist. However, it wasn’t until he traveled to Britain that he really began to consider art as a viable career. He often draws inspiration, he has said, from Arabian architecture, from the cities of Jeddah and Makkah, but also from the sea.

Zeinab Al-Mahoozi
Qatif-based Al-Mahoozi often uses her murals and stencilled graffiti to tackle social issues, particularly women’s rights. She is part of a growing movement of young female Khaleeji artists who see art as a powerful opportunity to make a statement about their society. Al-Mahoozi’s, “Panadol of the Soul,” created this year, was on display at “The Saudi Gallery.”

 


ICESCO announces prizes in Remote Culture initiative 

Updated 02 April 2020

ICESCO announces prizes in Remote Culture initiative 

  • Remote Culture is part of the “ICESCO Digital Home” initiative launched to support member states' efforts in fighting COVID-19

RIYADH: The Islamic World Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (ICESCO) has announced the creation of three awards for students in three cultural areas as part of its Remote Culture initiative.

The first prize is $6,000, the second is $4,000 and the third is $2,000, in addition to certificates of appreciation, in the fields of short story writing and painting, the organization said.

National committees in member states will communicate with educational institutions to invite students to take part in competitions, and will select three works of each category to be sent to ICESCO by the end of June 2020.

The organization then will form a specialized international jury to choose the best three works in each branch.

The initiative is part of the “ICESCO Digital Home” initiative launched to support member states' efforts in combating the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) and to find alternative solutions to ensure the sustainability of its educational, scientific and cultural work.

The new ICESCO initiative includes remote training and capacity-building for heritage frameworks, where the organization will be preparing and broadcasting a series of videos through its website as of April 15.

The videos include training programs in physical and intangible heritage, and documentation of cultural heritage using artificial intelligence techniques and risk-, crisis- and disaster-management in heritage sites and museums.

They will also introduce techniques for registering heritage sites on the lists of Islamic world heritage and world heritage, rehabilitating endangered crafts, promoting the general principles of managing museums in the Islamic world and protecting underwater cultural heritage.

The initiative also offers an invitation for remote reading to take advantage of ICESCO's digital libraries and other sites available.