Toddler eaten by leopard in Uganda’s national park

A leopard hunting in Uganda (Shutterstock)
Updated 07 May 2018

Toddler eaten by leopard in Uganda’s national park

  • The child had left the safety of the a safari headquarters when he was attacked by the leopard
  • A search has been launched to capture the big cat as safari workers fear it now has a taste for human flesh

KAMPALA: Ugandan authorities were on Monday hunting for a leopard that snatched and ate the three-year-old son of a female ranger working in the popular Queen Elizabeth National Park.
The boy had been left in the care of a nanny at the unfenced staff quarters of a safari lodge in the park, when he was taken by the leopard on Friday night.
Wildlife authority spokesman Bashir Hangi said the child had followed the nanny outdoors.
“The maid was not aware the child followed her. She heard the kid scream for help, she intervened but it was too late the leopard had vanished with it in the bush and a search was mounted until we got the skull the next day,” he said.
“The hunt is on with the intention of capturing the leopard and removing it from the wild because once it has eaten human flesh, the temptations are high to eat another human being, it becomes dangerous,” he added.


Lion cub Simba born in Singapore via artificial insemination

Updated 26 January 2021

Lion cub Simba born in Singapore via artificial insemination

  • It is rare for lions to be conceived through artificial insemination
  • Singapore’s new cub, named after the main character in Disney’s ‘The Lion King’

SINGAPORE: The Singapore Zoo has welcomed a lion cub named Simba to its animal kingdom following artificial insemination that officials said Tuesday was a first for the city-state.
It is rare for lions to be conceived through artificial insemination, with the procedure first carried out successfully in 2018 — resulting in two cubs in South Africa.
Lion populations in the wild have plummeted more than 40 percent over the past two decades, with about 23,000 to 39,000 mature animals left, according to the International Union for Conservation of Nature.
It lists lions as vulnerable.
Singapore’s new cub, named after the main character in Disney’s “The Lion King,” was conceived with semen from an elderly African lion.
The father Mufasa, who also takes his name from the animated film, was in poor health and did not survive the procedure, the zoo said.
Simba, who was born in October, is being cared for by his mother Kayla and zookeepers, and is “healthy and inquisitive,” officials said.
A video showed Simba being fed from a bottle and playing with a ball.