Saudi Cabinet expresses support for Yemenis’ efforts against Houthis

King Salman meets with former US Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice in Riyadh on Tuesday. The former US official also met Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman. They discussed a number of issues of common interest. (SPA)
Updated 06 December 2017

Saudi Cabinet expresses support for Yemenis’ efforts against Houthis

RIYADH: The Saudi Cabinet has expressed hope that the uprising of Yemenis against the Iranian-backed Houthi militias will save the country from death threats, exclusion, bombings and seizure of properties.

Chaired by King Salman at Al-Yamamah Palace in Riyadh on Tuesday, the Cabinet welcomed a statement from the Arab coalition supporting legitimacy in Yemen.
The Cabinet also welcomed the statement issued by the international conference in London on the Yemen crisis and its full support for the Kingdom’s legitimate right to defend itself against threats to its security and stability. It also praised the statement, which condemned Houthi action saying that the launching of ballistic missiles at the Kingdom constitutes a threat to regional security and prolongs the conflict, and for its call for an end to such attacks.
The Cabinet renewed the Kingdom’s keenness over Yemen’s stability, its return to its Arab environment and preservation of its land, security, identity, integrity and social unity in the framework of Arab regional and global security.
On terror issues, the Cabinet expressed the Kingdom’s strong condemnation of a terror attack on a university college in Peshawar, Pakistan, and expressed the Kingdom’s support for Pakistan against terrorism and extremism.
Later, a series of memorandums of understanding for cooperation in political consultation, labor, logistics and infrastructure with Georgia, Turkmenistan, Russia, the People’s Republic of China and the UAE were approved by the Cabinet.

Board meeting
The king also chaired the 48th meeting of the Board of Directors of the King Abdulaziz Foundation for Research and Archives.
The board finalized a number of decisions concerning the working of the organization including the regulations of the National Center for Saudi Ardah in accordance with the King Abdulaziz Foundation.
The board also endorsed a memorandum of cooperation between the King Abdulaziz Foundation and Naif Arab University for Security Sciences in order to benefit from the latter’s expertise and knowledge.
The board was also briefed on a cultural project, run by the foundation under the directives of King Salman as an initiative aiming at linking young people to the history of the Kingdom as well as of the Arab Islamic history.
The board also approved other routine issues.

 

Saudi Arabia announces 5 more COVID-19 deaths

Updated 46 min 28 sec ago

Saudi Arabia announces 5 more COVID-19 deaths

  • The total number of recoveries in the Kingdom has increased to 369,922
  • A total of 6,519 people have succumbed to the virus in the Kingdom so far

RIYADH: Saudi Arabia announced five deaths from COVID-19 and 384 new infections on Friday.
Of the new cases, 187 were recorded in Riyadh, 68 in the Eastern Province, 55 in Makkah, 24 in the Northern Borders region, 10 in Madinah, six in Hail, five in Asir, five in Najran and three in Jazan.
The total number of recoveries in the Kingdom increased to 369,922 after 309 more patients recovered from the virus.
A total of 6,519 people have succumbed to the virus in the Kingdom so far.


Saudi Arabia’s AlUla airport to receive international flights

Updated 05 March 2021

Saudi Arabia’s AlUla airport to receive international flights

RIYADH: Saudi Arabia’s General Authority of Civil Aviation (GACA) has approved the landing of international flights at Prince Abdul Majeed bin Abdulaziz Airport in AlUla.

The airport’s annual capacity has increased from 100,000 passengers to 400,000 and its area has increased to 2.4 million square meters, Saudi Press Agency (SPA) reported.

The airport is among the 10 biggest airports in the Kingdom and can accommodate up to 15 commercial aircraft at any one time.


After miracle saves daughter’s life, Saudi father champions organ donation cause

Updated 05 March 2021

After miracle saves daughter’s life, Saudi father champions organ donation cause

  • Citizens need to educate themselves about the process and urgent need for organ donors

RIYADH: After a liver transplant saved his 70-day-old daughter’s life, a Saudi father has made it his life mission to ensure that others have the same chance.

Soliman Saidi, whose daughter Salma turns three this year, is campaigning to have more Saudis step up to the plate and sign up to become organ donors.
Saidi, a motivational speaker who has been advocating for the cause of organ donation, spoke to Arab News about the urgent need for more volunteers in the Kingdom to donate organs after death in order to help save lives.
“Most people have a lot of misconceptions about organ donation,” he said. “They assume that signing up to be a donor means that they will have to sacrifice body parts that they need to survive, but that’s never the case. While some organs can be donated while a person is still alive, like a kidney or part of the liver, organs like the heart and lungs can only be donated after a person is dead.”
Saidi added that, from a religious point of view, there is nothing to prevent potential donors from signing up.
A 1982 fatwa (religious edict) by the Senior Ulama Commission concerning organ donation and transplantation granted “the permissibility to remove an organ or part thereof from a dead person,” and the permissibility of a living person donating an organ or part of it.
The Kingdom’s primary organization for organ transplants was founded in 1984, the Saudi Center for Organ Transplantation (SCOT). Since then, the organization has worked to raise awareness of the importance of organ donation and has given Saudis a platform where they can sign-up to become donors.

Soliman Saidi is grateful to still have his daughter in his life every single day. (Supplied)

However, statistics suggest that more citizens need to educate themselves about the process and the urgent need for organ donors.
A 2019 study published in the Saudi Journal of Kidney Diseases and Transplantation showed that the majority of the Kingdom’s population are unaware of any local or international organ donation legislation. The level of knowledge was as low as 12.6 percent, which the study claims has led to a low number of potential organ donors in the country.
The same study indicates that Saudi Arabia has a low organ donation rate, estimated at 2 to 4 per million population (PMP). Compared with other countries, such as the US with a 26 PMP donor rate, the number is fairly low.
However, SCOT has nonetheless seen success in the Kingdom. According to figures recorded between 1986 and 2016, there were 13,174 organs transplanted from living and deceased donors, including 10,569 kidneys, 2,006 livers, 339 hearts, 213 lungs and 46 pancreases.
Saidi was motivated to start campaigning for the cause in 2018 after he received what he said was “the worst news of his life” just months after the birth of his youngest child.
“Two months after Salma was born, she experienced liver failure. By the time we realized what was happening, her liver was already failing by about 70 percent,” he said.
Saidi recalled the desperation he felt after being told that Salma needed a Kasai procedure, a risky operation that involves the removal of blocked bile ducts and the gallbladder, and replacing them with a segment of the small intestine.
Doctors informed him that the procedure had a 1 percent chance of saving her life, but he was willing to take the risk.
“She was barely 70 days old,” he said. “I remember thinking ‘dear God, if she has to go under the knife tomorrow, let her live. I want to see her as a bride someday, let her have a chance.’”

HIGHLIGHTS

• A 1982 fatwa (religious edict) by the Senior Ulama Commission concerning organ donation and transplantation granted ‘the permissibility to remove an organ or part thereof from a dead person,’ and the permissibility of a living person donating an organ or part of it.

• Those interested in signing up as organ donors after death in Saudi Arabia can register with SCOT on their website.

However, the procedure was only a temporary solution, and it eventually became clear that what Salma needed was a liver transplant.
“There was nothing we could do at that point but leave it up to Allah,” he said. “At that point, we were fully desperate, and feeling so helpless. All we could do was ask Allah to spare her life.”
Miraculously, Saidi, together with his wife Hajer, were able to arrange for Salma to be moved to the King Faisal Specialist Hospital in Riyadh. They also flew to the capital from their home in Jeddah in the hopes that they would find a donor for their daughter.
“Finding any type of organ donor is a long process, but liver donors in particular are rare. It normally takes ages,” said Saidi. “And this was happening during the Eid Al-Adha holiday. We were fast losing hope that we would find a donor in time.”
However, through the dedicated efforts of hospital staff, Hajer was picked as a viable donor and the family were informed that they could begin preparations almost immediately.
Saidi said that one of the most emotional experiences of the whole process was the way people online had reacted to his plight, and the number of people who reached out when he posted about the issue on social media.
“People were calling me and literally pleading with me to allow them to donate,” he said, growing emotional as he recounted the story. “One of the most incredible gestures I received was a man who called from Tabuk and asked me only to arrange things with hospital staff to allow him to fly in and donate part of his liver, and specifically requested that I not meet with him in order to maintain
anonymity.”
The experience moved him, and when it became clear that both mother and daughter would make a full recovery, Saidi decided to become a champion for
the cause of organ donation in the Kingdom.
“I learned very quickly that convincing people to donate a part of themselves after death was hard enough on its own, let alone trying to convince them to donate while they’re alive,” he said. “But after my own experience, I was determined to do whatever I could to help.”
Saidi is also an adviser to a nonprofit organization, Awad Al-Amal, which enables young patients and their families to overcome disease and difficulties by providing rehabilitation programs and voluntary health services.
Today, Saidi says he has made peace with what happened, and is grateful to still have his daughter in his life every single day.
“I believe everything happens for a reason,” he told Arab News, “I think this experience taught me to never take anything for granted, and it humbled me and reminded me that no one is untouchable in this life.”
Those interested in signing up as organ donors after death in Saudi Arabia can register with SCOT on their website at scot.gov.sa/ar/Register/Index?type=AfterDie.


Saudi scouts in environmental protection project

Updated 05 March 2021

Saudi scouts in environmental protection project

RIYADH: The Saudi Arabian Boy Scouts Association is continuing with an environmental protection project throughout the Kingdom. The national program being operated under the title, “My Environment is My Responsibility,” will run until March 11.
The scouting organization’s commissioner for service and community development, Ahmed Al-Asiri, said that in cooperation with relevant sectors the association wanted to promote the values of belonging, responsibility, positivity, working together, love for others, volunteering, and hygiene.

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Saudi ministry closes 366 shops in virus crackdown

Updated 05 March 2021

Saudi ministry closes 366 shops in virus crackdown

RIYADH: The Saudi Ministry of Municipal, Rural Affairs and Housing has closed 366 establishments in the Kingdom that violated precautionary health measures to limit the spread of coronavirus.
The ministry said that field teams in various regions and governorates of the Kingdom carried out 24,066 inspection tours of shops, food establishments and public utility markets.
Inspections resulted in the detection of 1,226 violations of health measures issued by the ministry and relevant public health authorities as part of the Kingdom’s anti-coronavirus efforts. The ministry said that municipalities had shut 366 establishments, and applied penalties according to regulations.