Saudi version of Takeshi’s Castle coming to Riyadh in 10 months

The president of General Sports Authority (GSA), Turki Al-Sheikh, with Tokyo Broadcasting System (TBS) Chairman Toshi Shika Ishihara after signing the agreement. (AN photo)
Updated 05 December 2017

Saudi version of Takeshi’s Castle coming to Riyadh in 10 months

JEDDAH: The president of General Sports Authority (GSA), Turki Al-Sheikh, announced on Nov. 24 in Tokyo an agreement with Tokyo Broadcasting System (TBS) Chairman Toshi Shika Ishihara to build a replica of the famous “Takeshi Castle” in Riyadh.
Al-Sheikh tweeted: “I was pleased to sign — a few minutes ago — in Tokyo an agreement with TBS, to establish Takeshi’s Castle in the Kingdom. The beginning will be in the last quarter of 2018.”
This is the first entertainment project announced by the GSA, and reflects a will to attract public attention toward sports activities.
According to GSA’s Twitter account, Al-Sheikh said: “We seek not only to entertain, but also to inspire people to exercise and experience new physical activities.”
The building of the castle will show Arab architectural elements on an area of 300,000 square meters. As the original version, it will include 50 obstacles, some specially designed for this project.
The Japanese show had a large following in Saudi Arabia and neighboring Arab countries during the mid to late 1980s. It was locally called “Al-Hisin” (The Fort), and the commentary was provided in Arabic by Lebanese television personality Riad Sharara and Palestinian news broadcaster Jamal Rayyan.
The original show was dubbed in many languages around the world, and it has a special place in the memory of Saudis and Arabs.
Saudis welcomed the GSA initiative to diversify its activities. Khalid said on Twitter: “When I was 15 I wanted to participate with the Japanese players; now I’m 45 and I still have the will to prepare myself and participate.”
Badriah commented on Twitter saying: “What I like about this idea is that it contains both entertainment, and physical activity, as well as the use of heritage in an innovative way, that is creative.”
Tokyo Broadcasting System was launched in the early 50s, one of their most important projects was TBS Television, which has created countless hit drama, shows, and news programs that played an important role in promoting Japanese culture around the world.


Florida offers drive-through Botox to quarantined residents

Updated 04 June 2020

Florida offers drive-through Botox to quarantined residents

  • US state allowed a partial relaxing of restrictions imposed to slow the coronavirus pandemic
  • Elective medical procedures resume, including Botox injections and cosmetic surgery

MIAMI: Quarantined Florida residents worried about their laughter lines and crows’ feet need frown no longer — Botox is back, and it’s being offered at a drive-through.
On May 4, the US state allowed a partial relaxing of restrictions imposed to slow the coronavirus pandemic. That means certain elective medical procedures could resume, including Botox injections and cosmetic surgery.
Michael Salzhauer, a plastic surgeon known as ‘Dr. Miami’ who has also starred in a reality television show, has been conducting drive-through Botox injections in the garage of his building in the posh Miami neighborhood of Bal Harbor.
Salzhauer said the idea struck him as he was sitting in his car waiting for a blood test for COVID-19 antibodies.
“The areas that we inject Botox are the upper face, exactly the parts of the face that aren’t covered by the mask so it’s really ideal,” Salzhauer said, while wearing a mask, face shield and surgical gown as he waited for his next drive-up patient.
Patients sign up online, paying an average of $600 each for a stippling of shots across their foreheads.
Arman Ohevshalom, 36, was enthusiastic as he waited in line with his wife in their car, although it was their first time receiving the injections.
“It’s very creative, and after seeing how they’re running it I feel just as comfortable as I would in the office,” he said.
Florida’s tattoo artists, however, are frustrated. Shuttered since March, they asking why they cannot open, too.
Botox injections are “kind of like tattooing, he’s injecting stuff into the skin,” said tattoo shop owner Chico Cortez. Florida is home to about 10,000 working tattoo artists, according to the Florida Professional Tattoo Artist Guild.
An emailed statement from a Miami-Dade County spokesperson said Mayor Carlos Gimenez has yet to set a date for reopening tattoo shops. “He is working with industry members and the medical experts to come up with the best way to reopen safely,” it said.