Saudi livestock firm SALIC in Dh5 billion joint venture with UAE’s Al Dahra

SALIC last week said it was considering investing in a Russian grain producer owned by Russian conglomerate. (Courtesy SALIC)
Updated 11 October 2017

Saudi livestock firm SALIC in Dh5 billion joint venture with UAE’s Al Dahra

ABU DHABI: The Saudi Agriculture and Livestock Investment Company (SALIC) is establishing a Dh5-billion joint venture with UAE agricultural firm Al Dahra to invest in the Black Sea region, the Saudi livestock firm’s chief executive said.
The joint venture will invest across 10 countries in the Black Sea and will be made via acquisitions in grains and livestock, Abdullah Aldubaikhi said during a UAE-Saudi business forum in the UAE capital on Tuesday.
“It is part of the food security strategy,” Aldubaikhi said.
Al Dahra, owned mainly by Abu Dhabi investors, partners with the UAE government for its food security program. SALIC said investments would include Russia, Ukraine, Romania, Belarus, Hungary and Bulgaria.
“Investing in agriculture abroad is very important for Saudi Arabia to compensate for the grains not being produced locally, we are part and parcel of this strategy,” Aldubaikhi said.
The announcement comes days after King Salman of Saudi Arabia met Russian President Vladimir Putin in Moscow, agreeing joint investment deals worth several billion dollars.
SALIC last week said it was considering investing in a Russian grain producer owned by Russian conglomerate Sistema and members of the Louis-Dreyfus family.


Emirates stops flights to three major Australian cities

Updated 16 January 2021

Emirates stops flights to three major Australian cities

  • Flights to/from Sydney, Brisbane and Melbourne will be suspended until further notice: Emirates
  • The airline will still run two flights a week to Perth

DUBAI: Emirates has suspended flights to Australia's three largest cities as the country further restricts international arrivals over fears of new virus strains.
The Dubai-based carrier was one of the last to maintain routes into and out of the country's east coast throughout most of the pandemic but on Friday evening told travellers a handful of planned flights next week would be the last.
"Due to operational reasons, Emirates flights to/from Sydney, Brisbane and Melbourne will be suspended until further notice," Emirates said on its website.
The airline will still run two flights a week to Perth, but the cuts are another barrier for tens of thousands of stranded Australians still attempting to return home.
The Australian government responded by announcing more repatriation flights and said other carriers still flying services to the cities could fill the gap.
"The capacity that Emirates was able to use within the cap will be allocated to other airlines, ensuring that there are still as many tickets, as many seats available into Australia," Finance Minister Simon Birmingham said.
A small number of airlines - including Qatar Airways and Singapore Airlines - are still running services to Australia but local media were already reporting delays and cancellations among returning travellers.
Australia's borders have effectively been closed since March to curb the spread of the virus, with the government even limiting the number of citizens allowed to return.
Last week travel restrictions were further tightened, with arrival numbers slashed and all travellers into the country requiring a negative Covid-19 test before flying.
In making the changes, Prime Minister Scott Morrison cited a growing number of people in quarantine testing positive for new strains of Covid-19.
Fears that a variant of the virus from Britain, believed to be more contagious, had leaked into Brisbane from hotel quarantine triggered a snap lockdown in the city last week.
"There are many unknowns and uncertainties in relation to the new strain, and so that's why this precautionary approach, we believe, is very sensible," Morrison said.
Australia continues to deal relatively well with the virus, having recorded about 28,600 cases and 909 deaths linked to Covid-19 in a population of 25 million.