Flash flood warning as Tropical Storm Cindy heads toward US

Flash flood warning as Tropical Storm Cindy heads toward US.(AFP)
Updated 21 June 2017

Flash flood warning as Tropical Storm Cindy heads toward US

MIAMI: Weather monitors warned Wednesday of tornados and potentially deadly flash floods as Tropical Storm Cindy in the Gulf of Mexico headed toward the coasts of Louisiana and Texas.
At 0600 GMT Cindy was located about 200 miles (325 kilometers) south of Morgan City, Louisiana, and 270 miles (435 kilometers) southeast of Galveston, Texas, the National Hurricane Center reported.
The storm packed winds of 60 miles (95 kilometers) per hour, and was moving toward the northwest at seven miles (11 kilometers) per hour.
Cindy is forecast to hit the coast of southwest Louisiana and southeast Texas late Wednesday, and move inland on Thursday.
It is expected to bring between six and nine inches of rain, “with isolated maximum amounts of 12 inches” in some areas.
“This rainfall could cause life-threatening flash flooding,” the NHC warned.
Cindy is not expected to reach hurricane status, but is nevertheless large: tropical storm force winds “extend outward up to 275 miles, mainly north through northeast of the center,” the NHC said.
The weather service also warned of possible isolated tornadoes on Wednesday from southern Louisiana to northern Florida.
The NHC issued a tropical storm warning for the coastal region between the central coast of Texas to the western Florida panhandle.


Mexico grants asylum to Bolivian leader Morales

Updated 12 November 2019

Mexico grants asylum to Bolivian leader Morales

  • Mexican Foreign Minister Marcelo Ebrard: Several minutes ago I received a phone call from (former) president Evo Morales to verbally and formally request political asylum in our country
  • Mexico had said it was prepared to grant Morales asylum, after Bolivia’s first indigenous president stepped down amid massive protests

MEXICO CITY: Mexico said Monday it has granted asylum to Bolivia’s Evo Morales, after the leftist president’s departure left the South American nation reeling amid a power vacuum.
“Several minutes ago I received a phone call from (former) president Evo Morales to verbally and formally request political asylum in our country,” Foreign Minister Marcelo Ebrard told a news conference.
“Interior Minister Olga Sanchez Cordero made the decision to grant him asylum... for humanitarian reasons.”
Morales will have asylum with immediate effect for his own protection, Ebrard added, but did not answer journalists’ questions on whether he would travel to Mexico, and if so when he would arrive.
Mexico had said Sunday it was prepared to grant Morales asylum, after Bolivia’s first indigenous president stepped down amid massive protests and growing unrest over his fraud-stained re-election on October 20.
Morales, 60, had been in power since 2006.