Sudan extends Khartoum curfew to slow coronavirus spread

Sudanese people walk past a closed mosque in Khartoum during Ramadan amid a curfew due to the coronavirus pandemic. (File/AFP)
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Updated 09 May 2020

Sudan extends Khartoum curfew to slow coronavirus spread

  • Travel between the capital and other Sudanese states will be banned
  • The Sudanese health ministry has so far reported 1,111 COVID-19 cases including 59 deaths

KHARTOUM: Sudan extended a curfew in and around the capital Khartoum for 10 days from Saturday as coronavirus cases mount, state media reported.
The Sudanese health ministry has so far reported 1,111 COVID-19 cases including 59 deaths, with Khartoum state hardest hit.
Authorities intially imposed a curfew in Khartoum for three weeks from April 18. With its twin city Omdurman, the capital has a population of more than five million.
“The health emergency committee decided to extend the curfew in Khartoum state starting Saturday and for 10 days,” the official SUNA news agency reported late Friday.
Travel between the capital and other Sudanese states will be banned, the news agency added.
Since March, Sudan has imposed a state of emergency, shuttering schools and universities, and almost totally closing its borders.
The country’s dilapidated health care system is already strained by acute shortages of medicines and medical supplies.
Last Sunday, the government announced that a minister of state in the transport and infrastructure ministry, Hashim Ibn Auf, had tested positive for the novel coronavirus.


UK govt: British women strip-searched in Qatar

Updated 29 October 2020

UK govt: British women strip-searched in Qatar

  • London describes incident as ‘unacceptable’
  • Strip-search took place in Doha airport

LONDON: British authorities have formally registered concerns with Qatar following reports that two women who are UK nationals were strip-searched in Doha.

The forced medical examinations were carried out in Doha airport after authorities discovered a newborn baby in a bin.

This, it is claimed, prompted them to conduct “urgently decided” intrusive examinations, described as “absolutely terrifying” by one of 13 Australian women on a flight to Sydney who were subjected to them.

The British women were part of a group that was forced to disembark flights before having their underwear removed for a female medical professional to carry out an examination assessing if they had recently given birth.

The complaint was registered by the UK’s Foreign and Commonwealth Office, which said in a statement: “We are providing ongoing support to two British women following an incident in Doha. We have formally expressed our concern with the Qatari authorities and Qatar Airways and are seeking assurances an unacceptable incident like this cannot happen again.”

Australian officials said passengers from 10 flights leaving Doha on Oct. 2 were subjected to the ordeal.

“The advice that has been provided indicates that the treatment of the women concerned was offensive, grossly inappropriate, and beyond circumstances in which the women could give free and informed consent,” said a spokeswoman for the office of Australia’s foreign minister.

Sources familiar with the incident have said the newborn is alive and in care, and the mother has not been identified.

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