G20 fights to save global economy from virus disaster

This photo taken and handout by the press office of Palazzo Chigi on March 26, 2020 shows Italian Prime Minister, Giuseppe Conte (L) taking part in a video conference as part of an extraordinary meeting of G20 leaders, from the Chigi Palace in Rome, during the country's lockdown following the COVID-19 new coronavirus pandemic. (AFP)
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Updated 01 June 2020
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G20 fights to save global economy from virus disaster

  • Action plan follows Saudi-led ‘virtual’ talks
  • Finance minister Mohammed Al-Jadaan said members would provide international financial assistance to the most vulnerable countries

DUBAI: The world’s 20 most powerful countries unveiled a raft of measures on Wednesday to deal with the crippling effects of the coronavirus pandemic as it threatens a global slump to rival the 1930s Great Depression.

“Immediate and exceptional measures” were announced by finance ministers and central bank governors of the G20 under the Saudi presidency, including a suspension of debt repayments by the world’s poorest countries.

The measures include “implementing unprecedented fiscal, monetary and financial stability actions, and ensuring that international financial institutions can provide critical support to developing and low income countries.”

Mohammed Al-Jadaan, the Saudi finance minister, and Ahmed Alkholifey, governor of the Saudi Arabian Monetary Authority (SAMA) said: “We are determined to spare no effort, both individually and collectively, to protect lives, bring the pandemic under control, safeguard people’s jobs and incomes, support the global economy during and after this phase and ensure the resilience of the financial system.”

Al-Jadaan said two concrete actions had been decided. “First, delivering a joint G20 action plan in response to COVID-19 ... in order to advance international economic cooperation as we navigate this crisis and look ahead to a robust and sustained global economic recovery.

“And second, providing international financial assistance to the most vulnerable countries.”

Debt relief for poor countries was a controversial issue because the US — the biggest economy — opposed some of the proposals. In the end the group said: “We support a time-bound suspension of debt service payments for the poorest countries that request forbearance. All bilateral official creditors will participate in this initiative, consistent with their national laws and internal procedures.”

The 5,000-word declaration also bound G20 governments to “safeguard people’s jobs and incomes, support the global economy during and after this phase, and ensure the resilience of the financial system.”

The digital meeting committed G20 members to an action plan on coordinated health measures, an economic and financial response, and a strategy to return to “strong, sustainable, balanced and inclusive growth once containment measures are lifted.”

The International Monetary Fund warned this week that the pandemic threatened to put the global economy into the deepest depression since the aftermath of the Great Crash of 1929.

Financial markets around the world shed some of the gains of recent days’ trading, with the S&P index, the Wall Street barometer, down more than 2 per cent.

Oil prices fell further despite the historic deal by OPEC+ producers eager earlier in the week.


Heavy rain and flash floods kill 33 in Afghanistan

Updated 14 April 2024
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Heavy rain and flash floods kill 33 in Afghanistan

  • Most casualties were from roof collapses while some 600 houses were damaged or destroyed
  • Some 20 of the nation’s 34 provinces were lashed by heavy rains after an unusually dry winter

KABUL: At least 33 people have been killed over three days of heavy rains and flash flooding in Afghanistan, the government’s disaster management department said Sunday.
“From Friday onward, because of the rains there were flash floods which caused high human and financial losses,” department spokesman Janan Sayeq said.
“The primary information shows that, unfortunately, in the floods, 33 people were martyred and 27 people got injured.”
Most casualties were from roof collapses while some 600 houses were damaged or destroyed, nearly 600 kilometers (370 miles) of road demolished, and around 2,000 acres of farmland “flooded away,” Sayeq said.
Some 20 of the nation’s 34 provinces were lashed by the heavy rains, which have followed an unusually dry winter season which has parched terrain and forced farmers to delay planting.
Since the Taliban returned to power in 2021 the flow of foreign aid into the impoverished country has drastically diminished, hindering relief responses to natural disasters.
At least 25 people were killed in a landslide after massive snowfall in eastern Afghanistan in February, whilst around 60 were killed in a three-week spate of precipitation ending in March.
The United Nations last year warned “Afghanistan is experiencing major swings in extreme weather conditions.”
Scientists say harsh weather patterns are being spurred by climate change and after being ravaged by four decades of war Afghanistan ranks among the nations least prepared to face the phenomenon.


Pope warns against ‘spiral of violence’ after Iran attack

Updated 14 April 2024
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Pope warns against ‘spiral of violence’ after Iran attack

  • The Pope once again repeated earlier calls for a ceasefire in Gaza and negotiation

VATICAN CITY: Pope Francis on Sunday made a “pressing appeal” against a “spiral of violence” after Iran’s unprecedented missile and drone attack on Israel, warning of a potential regional conflagration.
“I make a pressing appeal for an end to any action which could fuel a spiral of violence that risks dragging the Middle East into an even greater conflict,” the Argentinian pontiff declared following his traditional Sunday prayer in Saint Peter’s Square at the Vatican.
“I am praying and following with concern, but also pain, the news that has come in recent hours about the worsening situation in Israel due to Iran’s intervention,” the pope told worshippers.
“No one should threaten the existence of others. All countries must, however, side with peace and help Israelis and Palestinians to live in two states, side by side and in security,” he said.
“That is their right,” Francis insisted as he once again repeated earlier calls for a ceasefire in Gaza and “negotiation.”
The pontiff futhermore demanded the world “help the population facing a humanitarian crisis” in Gaza and urged the “immediate release of the hostages kidnapped months ago” by Hamas, setting in train the latest chapter of violence in the region.


MI5 sued by Manchester Arena bomb survivors

Updated 14 April 2024
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MI5 sued by Manchester Arena bomb survivors

  • Relatives of victims say failure to stop Salman Abedi before attack violated Human Rights Act
  • 22 people were murdered and hundreds injured at Ariana Grande concert in 2017

London: UK intelligence agency MI5 is being sued by hundreds of survivors of the 2017 Manchester Arena bombing.

Twenty-two people were killed at an Ariana Grande concert in May that year when Salman Abedi, 22, detonated a homemade device loaded with nuts and bolts in the venue’s foyer, leaving hundreds more injured.

An inquiry into the attack subsequently found “there was a realistic possibility that actionable intelligence could have been obtained which might have led to actions preventing the attack.”

Sir John Saunders, the presiding judge in the inquiry, added that an MI5 officer had missed a “significant” opportunity to act and that there was a lack of communication between the intelligence agency and counterterrorism police.

A group of 250 survivors and relatives of those who died say MI5 could have prevented the attack, and that negligence in failing to do so breaches the “right to life” enshrined in the UK’s Human Rights Act.

MI5 will be required to present all evidence about how preventable the situation was at a hearing likely to happen in early 2025.

The inquiry found that MI5 had received information on Abedi in the months before the attack, but an official, identified as Witness J, said it had been treated as a criminal matter, and not related to terrorism. On questioning, Saunders found that other MI5 officials had held concerns at the time that this was a mistake, and that in any event, MI5 had kept the information it received about Abedi secret.

Saunders said that had it been treated differently and action taken, Abedi might conceivably have been detained on May 18, 2017 when he arrived at Manchester Airport from Libya with, it is believed, items related to bomb-making.

In 2023 MI5 Director General Ken McCallum issued an apology on behalf of the agency, saying that it was “profoundly sorry” for what had happened.

A spokesperson for three law firms representing the complainants — Hudgell Solicitors, Slater and Gordon and Broudie Jackson Canter — said: “Legal teams representing injured survivors of the Manchester Arena bombing in 2017 can confirm that they have collectively submitted a group claim on behalf of more than 250 clients to the Investigatory Powers Tribunal. As it is an ongoing legal matter, we are unable or provide any further details, or comment further, at this stage.”

A legal source told The Times: “This legal action is not about money or compensation, it’s about holding MI5 to account for failing to prevent 22 people dying and many hundreds more being seriously injured.”

Legal action against intelligence services in the UK, which goes through the Investigatory Powers Tribunal rather than the UK court system, is rare but not unprecedented.

In 2016 Prime Minister Theresa May was forced to issue an apology for the role played by MI6 in the rendition, detention and torture of Abdul Hakim BelHajj by the US in 2004. BelHajj’s wife, who was detained alongside him and was pregnant at the time, received £500,000 ($622,850) in compensation.

Joseph Kotrie-Monson, whose law firm represented a former British intelligence officer suing the UK government over post-traumatic stress resulting from his work, told The Times: “There is always the challenge of proving causation in any case where a public body has been accused of a failure in its duties, particularly when it comes to the security services.

“Disclosure of evidence is also often a terminal problem for any legal action, and typically the domestic courts will err on the side of caution when it comes to government bodies protecting confidential information.

“However, this particular forum, and the human rights claim, may be well suited to dealing with the challenges of a complaint against a clandestine organization like MI5.”


India’s Modi promises jobs, infrastructure if BJP wins third term

Updated 14 April 2024
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India’s Modi promises jobs, infrastructure if BJP wins third term

  • India’s general election, which begins April 19, will be held in seven stages till June 1
  • Modi is widely tipped to win record-equaling third term on the back of his 10-year record

NEW DELHI: Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) promised on Sunday to create jobs, boost infrastructure and expand welfare programs if it wins a third term, seeking to address key voter concerns ahead of next week’s elections.

The general election, which begins on April 19, will be held in seven stages until June 1. Votes are due to be counted on June 4 and results are expected the same day.

Modi, 73, is widely tipped to win a record-equalling third term on the back of his 10-year record, which includes strong economic growth, infrastructure projects, welfare handouts and aggressive Hindu nationalism.

Surveys, however, suggest unemployment, inflation and rural distress remain issues of concern in the world’s most populous country despite its strong economy, and addressing these will be Modi’s biggest challenge.

“Our focus is on dignity of life ... on quality of life, our focus is also on creating jobs through investment,” Modi said after releasing the manifesto, titled Modi’s Guarantee, at the party headquarters in the capital.

Modi said the manifesto is focused on creating jobs in sectors such as infrastructure, aviation, railways, electric vehicles, green energy, semiconductors and pharmaceuticals, among others, in a bid to address discontent at unemployment levels that are rising despite strong economic growth.

“India’s youth will not have even imagined the number of opportunities that will come their way,” he told cheering BJP members, including top federal ministers who sat in the audience wearing stoles featuring the BJP’s lotus symbol.

CONGRESS CLAIMS EMPTY PROMISES

Congress, the main opposition party, which has been struggling to revive its fortunes, said it was not impressed by a manifesto that is filled with “empty promises.”

“Today, people want to ask what happened in the last 10 years,” Congress lawmaker Manish Tewari said. “Unemployment is rampant and inflation has broken the back of common people.

The people of the country will hold him (Modi) to account for what’s happened in the last 10 years.”

Modi also vowed to expand welfare programs, including bringing all Indians above the age of 70 under an existing free health insurance program and pushing piped cooking gas connections to all houses to follow up on a subsidized cooking gas cylinder program launched in 2016.

Other BJP promises include raising the cap on loans for non-farming small and micro borrowers, offering free housing for another 30 million poor and keeping up a free grains program for 800 million Indians until 2029.

The manifesto said the BJP government would continue to focus on a path of low inflation and fiscal prudence to achieve high economic growth.

“The ambition of the 1.4 billion people of the country is Modi’s mission,” Modi said. “I am placing this manifesto before the people to seek their blessings. Please bless us ... to increase our strength ... implement this manifesto and ensure a developed India.”

Unemployment was the primary concern of 27 percent of the 10,000 voters surveyed by Lokniti-CSDS across 19 of India’s 28 states, with rising prices coming second at 23 percent, the Hindu newspaper reported last week.

The unemployment rate rose to 5.4 percent in 2022/23, from 4.9 percent in 2013/14 just before Modi swept to power, and nearly 16 percent of urban youth in the 15-29 years age group remained unemployed in 2022/23 due to poor skills and a lack of quality jobs, official data shows.

“BJP does not even want to discuss the most important issues related to people’s lives,” Congress leader Rahul Gandhi posted on X. 

“This time the youth is not going to fall into Modi’s trap, now they will strengthen the hands of Congress and bring an ‘employment revolution’ in the country.” 


Ancient New Year celebration caps long Eid holidays in Bangladesh

Updated 14 April 2024
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Ancient New Year celebration caps long Eid holidays in Bangladesh

  • New Year’s parade in Dhaka was added to UNESCO’s intangible cultural heritage list in 2016
  • Festive procession was first organized as protest against military rule by college students

DHAKA: Thousands of Bangladeshis crowded the streets of Dhaka on Sunday to welcome the Bengali New Year in a festive and colorful celebration reconnecting them with their traditional heritage.

In the capital, people were clad in traditional attire with many dressed in red as they marched and danced in a procession that started at a prominent arts college on the Dhaka University campus.

The parade, called Mangal Shobhajatra, was recognized as an intangible cultural heritage in 2016 by UNESCO.

“This Bengali New Year celebration is part and parcel of our culture,” said Arafat Rahman, a student at Dhaka University.

“This is the only festival in our culture where people from all walks of life join together irrespective of class, caste, and religion. With these celebrations, we welcome the new year with a hope of prosperity for the next year and wish for the well-being of the countrymen.”

Rahman, who is a third-year arts student and has participated in the rally since he enrolled in Dhaka University, said the elaborate and colorful masks used in the procession are picked from Bangladesh’s folk cultures, while the choice of animal figures is linked to the lives of farmers and people in rural areas.

“To many extents, through this procession, people reconnect themselves with the origin and nature of this land,” he said.

Bangladeshis were clad in traditional attire, with many dressed in red, as they marched with colorful masks in Dhaka on April 14, 2024. (AN Photo) 

For Mily Khan, a 37-year-old resident of Dhaka, the New Year parade is a reminder of Bangladesh’s heritage.

“Every year, the celebration style remains the same, but it reignites the spirit of Bengali culture among the minds of the people. This celebration is something we need to nurture most as it is part of our roots, and this is our identity as a Bengali-speaking nation,” Khan said.

“Nowadays, our life has become more automated and urban. We can’t manage time to visit the homes in the villages. But the Mangal Shobhajatra rally, fairs, welcoming the new year with dance and songs, all these components together remind us of the origin of our culture.”

Sunday was a national holiday in Bangladesh. This year, the Bengali New Year — known locally as Pohela Boishakh — took place right after the Eid Al-Fitr holidays, with various celebrations taking place across the country of 170 million people.

The Bengali calendar emerged under the 16th-century Mughal emperor Akbar, who combined Islamic and solar Hindu calendars to facilitate tax collection.

The New Year celebrations in Bangladesh have also been a medium of protest “against all sorts of irregularities and oppression in society,” especially in recent years, said Prof. Muntasir Mamun, a renowned Bangladeshi historian.

“This Mangal Shobhajatra was first organized (in 1989) as a protest against the then military ruler of the country. Mangal Shobhajatra is the only secular festival in the world that originated as a tool of protest, and to date, it holds the same spirit,” Mamun told Arab News.

“It’s a rally of festivity, joy, and protest also. The fine arts department (at Dhaka University) always organizes the rally without any corporate sponsor. They do it with people’s participation and by the little contributions from the public,” he said.

“This approach made the Mangal Shobhajatra a platform for all the people of the country … It’s a platform where people from all walks of life join together, wishing for a peaceful society.”