Pakistan offers 1,000 scholarships to Sri Lankan students

Pakistan’s new High Commissioner to Sri Lanka Maj. Gen. (r) Muhammad Saad Khattak met with Sri Lankan President Gotabaya Rajapaksa in Colombo on February 25, 2020. (Courtesy: Pakistan High Commission)
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Updated 26 February 2020

Pakistan offers 1,000 scholarships to Sri Lankan students

  • The country’s higher education authorities will soon visit Sri Lanka to interview the applicants
  • Pakistan also plans to provide funding to Sri Lankan students enrolled in their own country

COLOMBO: Pakistan’s new High Commissioner to Sri Lanka Maj. Gen. (r) Muhammad Saad Khattak on Monday announced his country’s decision to offer 1,000 fully-funded scholarships to Sri Lankan students while meeting with President Gotabaya Rajapaksa.

The envoy also met with Prime Minister Mahinda Rajapaksa on the same day.

The Pakistani high commissioner said the scholarships would be offered under the Pak-Sri Lanka Higher Education Cooperation Program, allowing Sri Lankan students to pursue undergraduate, postgraduate and doctoral degree programs in a vast array of fields, such as engineering, medicine, information technology, and social sciences, in Pakistan.

The scholarships are open to students of all faiths.




Pakistan’s new High Commissioner to Sri Lanka Maj. Gen. (r) Muhammad Saad Khattak met with Sri Lankan Prime Minister Mahinda Rajapaksa in Colombo on February 25, 2020. (Courtesy: Pakistan High Commission)

“This program has already been given wide publicity in Sri Lanka. The final deadline for submitting applications for the scholarships is this Saturday, Feb. 29, 2020,” the high commissioner noted.

He added that Pakistan’s higher education authorities would soon visit Sri Lanka to interview the applicants.

“Pakistan is also keen to offer scholarships to students studying in Sri Lanka in terms of monetary funding,” elaborated the High Commissioner, recalling that during President Chandrika Kumaratunga’s tenure, his country offered a similar scholarship program. “This was extended to children of servicemen, especially those who sacrificed their lives to their country.”

Pointing out that the two countries were already enjoying good military ties, the high commissioner explained that he was also concentrating on promoting trade between Sri Lanka and Pakistan.

The Pakistan mission in Colombo is already organizing a conference and a seminar in April where the business communities of the two countries would interact.

President Rajapaksa also commended Pakistan for the excellent work done in promoting Taxila – an important Gandhara city that used to have popular Buddhist and Hindu centers of learning – and promised to extend Sri Lanka’s support in this regard.

The high commissioner said he was particularly interested in taking more Sri Lankan goods to the Pakistani market.

The two parties also discussed cooperation within the SAARC region and the benefits of strengthening the regional organization. On the cooperation in multilateral fora, the high commissioner said, “We have always stood by you, and we will continue to stand with you.”


Ex-Pakistan cricket great Miandad says spot-fixers should be hanged

Updated 04 April 2020

Ex-Pakistan cricket great Miandad says spot-fixers should be hanged

  • 'An example should be set,' Miandad said on his YouTube channel on Friday
  • Cheating in cricket via match and spot-fixing has stained the country’s favorite sport for years

KARACHI: Cricketers involved in match-fixing should be hanged, former Pakistan batting great Javed Miandad suggested Friday.
Match-fixing and spot-fixing — determining the outcome of a specific part of a game rather than the overall result — have stained the country’s sport for several years.
“Players who are involved in spot-fixing should be severely punished,” Miandad, who scored Pakistan’s second-highest Test runs with 8832, said on his YouTube channel.
“Spot-fixers should be hanged because it is similar to killing someone, and so the punishment should also be on the same lines. An example should be set so that no player even thinks about doing something like this.”
His remarks follow player Mohammad Hafeez’s protests over former opener Sharjeel Khan’s return despite receiving a five-year ban in 2017 over a spot-fixing case.
Meanwhile, Pakistan batsman Umar Akmal faces a ban of six months to life after being charged for not reporting a fixing offer last month, a crime under Pakistan Cricket Board’s anti-corruption code.
Fixing was exposed in 1995 after Australians Shane Warne, Tim May and Mark Waugh alleged then-skipper Salim Malik offered them bribes to under-perform in matches.
That led to a judicial inquiry that banned Malik for life.
But in 2010, then Pakistan skipper Salman Butt and fast bowlers Mohammad Amir and Mohammad Asif were involved in a spot-fixing case that led to five-year bans.
Only Amir returned to international cricket — a comeback that also raised opposition, most prominently by Hafeez.