Saudi sculptor digs up to 20 meters to reach perfect stones

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Jobran Salim at work. (Supplied)
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Sculptor Jobran Salim's products come in different forms. (Supplied)
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Sculptor Jobran Salim's products come in different forms. (Supplied)
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Sculptor Jobran Salim's products come in different forms. (Supplied)
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Sculptor Jobran Salim's products come in different forms. (Supplied)
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Sculptor Jobran Salim's products come in different forms. (Supplied)
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Sculptor Jobran Salim's products come in different forms. (Supplied)
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Sculptor Jobran Salim's products come in different forms. (Supplied)
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Sculptor Jobran Salim's products come in different forms. (Supplied)
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Jobran Salim at work. (Supplied)
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Updated 16 February 2020

Saudi sculptor digs up to 20 meters to reach perfect stones

  • Salim says that he uses primitive tools made of steel to extract stone from the mountains
  • He uses over 200 tools to cut stones into smaller pieces and mold them the way he wants

ABHA: Jobran Salim, a Saudi man in his mid-50s, can swiftly turn stone into beautiful household pieces and amazing accessories. His father passed down this craft to him and he has mastered it to perfection. 

He lives in an area located on the borders of the Kingdom and Yemen, south Jazan, and loves to hand-carve different pieces out of stone.

Salim, a deft sculptor, told Arab News that he uses primitive tools made of steel to extract stone from the mountains. He has to dig up to 20 meters in order to reach the perfect stones he needs to carve his works. The process can be laborious because of his old tools.

The red clay on top of a mountain signifies that its stone can be sculpted and new shapes can be carved out of it. The sculptor should have great skills to do this task because it is not an easy one.

Salim uses over 200 tools to cut the stone into smaller pieces and mold them the way he wants. He can make pots, plates, cups, forks and spoons with great precision.

“My father was a great sculptor and he taught all the skills I use today around 35 years ago. He showed me how to get the perfect stone and how to recognize a mountain that has good pieces of stone. My children don’t like my job and don’t want to learn to be a sculptor because they believe it is dangerous and entails many risks, which they are not willing to take,” he said.

Jibal Qais or the Qais Mountains, located on the Saudi-Yemeni border, have the best stone and one can see the red clay clearly on top of the mountains right before the sunrise. He used the stones of one of these mountains for 10 years because it had a lot of good material.

In his opinion, the best cooking pots are the ones made out of stone as they give cooked food a special taste.


Florida offers drive-through Botox to quarantined residents

Updated 04 June 2020

Florida offers drive-through Botox to quarantined residents

  • US state allowed a partial relaxing of restrictions imposed to slow the coronavirus pandemic
  • Elective medical procedures resume, including Botox injections and cosmetic surgery

MIAMI: Quarantined Florida residents worried about their laughter lines and crows’ feet need frown no longer — Botox is back, and it’s being offered at a drive-through.
On May 4, the US state allowed a partial relaxing of restrictions imposed to slow the coronavirus pandemic. That means certain elective medical procedures could resume, including Botox injections and cosmetic surgery.
Michael Salzhauer, a plastic surgeon known as ‘Dr. Miami’ who has also starred in a reality television show, has been conducting drive-through Botox injections in the garage of his building in the posh Miami neighborhood of Bal Harbor.
Salzhauer said the idea struck him as he was sitting in his car waiting for a blood test for COVID-19 antibodies.
“The areas that we inject Botox are the upper face, exactly the parts of the face that aren’t covered by the mask so it’s really ideal,” Salzhauer said, while wearing a mask, face shield and surgical gown as he waited for his next drive-up patient.
Patients sign up online, paying an average of $600 each for a stippling of shots across their foreheads.
Arman Ohevshalom, 36, was enthusiastic as he waited in line with his wife in their car, although it was their first time receiving the injections.
“It’s very creative, and after seeing how they’re running it I feel just as comfortable as I would in the office,” he said.
Florida’s tattoo artists, however, are frustrated. Shuttered since March, they asking why they cannot open, too.
Botox injections are “kind of like tattooing, he’s injecting stuff into the skin,” said tattoo shop owner Chico Cortez. Florida is home to about 10,000 working tattoo artists, according to the Florida Professional Tattoo Artist Guild.
An emailed statement from a Miami-Dade County spokesperson said Mayor Carlos Gimenez has yet to set a date for reopening tattoo shops. “He is working with industry members and the medical experts to come up with the best way to reopen safely,” it said.