Where We Are Going Today: Qormuz Jewelry

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Updated 21 December 2019

Where We Are Going Today: Qormuz Jewelry

  • Qormuz produces brooches adorned with a natural pearl to turn a simple

JEDDAH: Designers behind Saudi brand Qormuz have been putting some natural sparkle into the jewelry range.

With a focus on heritage and legacy, the product designs are simple, using the bark of agarwood (or oud in the Arab world) — a fragrant, dark resinous wood used in incense and perfume — to give a unique look to jewelry items.

A small fragment of bark forms the centerpiece to rings, bracelets and necklaces, incorporated with gold, precious stones such as onyx or rose quartz, or wrapped sections of braided leather.

Qormuz also produces brooches adorned with a natural pearl to turn a simple, everyday look into one of elegance and style.

The designers provide perfumes infused with oils such as cardamom, lemon, musk, sandalwood, and saffron, carefully mixed with the oud to give an aromatic and adventurous feel to the jewelry.


AlUla cultural and heritage site to reopen in October

Updated 02 June 2020

AlUla cultural and heritage site to reopen in October

  • Historic destination in northwest of Kingdom will now be accessible to visitors all year round

JEDDAH: When you’re already a quarter-of-a-million years old, a few months out of action because of a coronavirus pandemic is no more than a blip in time.

It is therefore safe to say that when visitors return to AlUla, the culture and heritage destination in northwest Saudi Arabia, not a lot will have changed.

AlUla’s attractions, including the Kingdom’s first UNESCO world heritage site, will reopen in October — and they will now be accessible all year round.

Walks, treks and trails will be available, guided by the local Rawi (Arabic storyteller) or self-guided, for visitors who want to delve deeper into the stories and customs of the region.

A visit to AlUla is a transformative experience to all who have visited — its vast open spaces, its secrets of civilizations gone by and the pure wonder of its landmarks.

“We are developing immersive, light-touch experiences that harness the power and silence of the landscapes, experiences like guided stargazing in a desert night sky that has inspired science, religion, philosophy, art and literature for millennia,” said Phillip Jones of the Royal Commission for AlUla.

Adventure tourists can tear around in a desert buggy or take to the skies in a vintage light aircraft to see volcanic craters and the lava fields of Harrat Khaybar. 

For families, Hijrat Noura, or Princess Noura Farm, offers a chance to observe the local flora and fauna. Winter Park, developed for the Winter at Tantora festival, will also return.

“A visit to AlUla is a transformative experience to all who have visited — its vast open spaces, its secrets of civilizations gone by and the pure wonder of its landmarks,” Jones said.