Malaysian ex-PM Najib’s 1MDB-related third corruption trial opens

Former Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak Najib is being jointly tried with 1MDB ex-CEO Arul Kanda Kandasamy. (AP)
Updated 18 November 2019

Malaysian ex-PM Najib’s 1MDB-related third corruption trial opens

  • Najib Razak is being jointly tried with 1MDB ex-CEO Arul Kanda Kandasamy

KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia: Former Malaysian leader Najib Razak’s third corruption trial has started, with prosecutors saying Najib tampered with a government audit on the 1MDB state investment fund in a bid to avoid civil and criminal proceedings.
Najib faces multiple corruption charges linked to the massive looting of the 1MDB fund, that contributed to his shocking election defeat last year.
Prosecutor Gopal Sri Ram said Monday his team will show how Najib had abused his power to order the removal of material information from the auditor-general’s report on 1MDB in 2016 to cover up the truth.
Najib is being jointly tried with 1MDB ex-CEO Arul Kanda Kandasamy, who is accused of abetting him. Monday’s trial opened just days after another court ordered Najib to enter his defense in his first corruption case.


Russia says world’s largest nuclear icebreaker embarks on Arctic voyage

Updated 22 September 2020

Russia says world’s largest nuclear icebreaker embarks on Arctic voyage

  • Russian state firm Rosatomflot has called the vessel the world’s largest and most powerful icebreaker
  • The ship was named after a Soviet-era icebreaker of the same name that in 1977 became the first surface ship to reach the North Pole

MOSCOW: A nuclear-powered ice breaker Russia says is the world’s largest and most powerful set off on Tuesday on a two-week journey to the Arctic as part of Moscow’s efforts to tap the region’s commercial potential.
Known as “Arktika,” the nuclear icebreaker left St. Petersburg and headed for the Arctic port of Murmansk, a journey that marks its entry into Russia’s icebreaker fleet.
Russian state firm Rosatomflot has called the vessel the world’s largest and most powerful icebreaker. It is more than 173 meters long, designed for a crew of 53, and can break ice almost three-meters thick.
The ship is seen as crucial to Moscow’s efforts to develop the Northern Sea Route, which runs from Murmansk to the Bering Strait near Alaska.
Amid warmer climate cycles, Russia hopes the route could become a mini Suez Canal, cutting sea transport times from Asia to Europe.
“The creation of a modern nuclear icebreaker fleet capable of ensuring regular year-round and safe navigation through the entire Northern Sea Route is a strategic task for our country,” Vyacheslav Ruksha, head of Rosatom’s Northern Sea Route Directorate, said in a statement.
Prior to its voyage to the Arctic, the icebreaker was tested during sea trials in the stormy waters of the Gulf of Finland, navigating its way through high winds and towering waves.
The ship was named after a Soviet-era icebreaker of the same name that in 1977 became the first surface ship to reach the North Pole.
Russia has stepped up its construction of icebreakers in a bid to increase freight traffic in Arctic waters.
President Vladimir Putin said last year that the country’s Arctic fleet would operate at least 13 heavy-duty icebreakers, the majority of which would be powered by nuclear reactors.