Sheep take over streets of Madrid for annual migration

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Shepherds leading more than 1800 sheep arrived at the Spanish capital, to promote the conservation of the ancient paths of transhumance (moving flocks from winter to summer pastures). (AFP/Oscar del Pozo)
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A flock of sheep walks past Madrid's Cityhall during the annual sheep parade through Madrid, Spain, October 20, 2019. (Reuters/Sergio Perez)
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A flock of sheep walks past Puerta del Sol, Madrid’s famous landmark, during the annual sheep parade through Madrid, Spain, October 20, 2019. (Reuters/Sergio Perez)
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Shepherds guided sheep through the Madrid streets in defence of ancient grazing and migration rights that seem increasingly threatened by urban sprawl and modern agricultural practices. (AP/Paul White)
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A child touches a sheep during the annual sheep parade through Madrid, Spain, October 20, 2019. (Reuters/Sergio Perez)
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A shepherd herds his sheep as flocks of sheep and goats crossed the city center of Madrid on October 20, 2019. (AFP/Oscar del Pozo)
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A flock of sheep walks past Madrid's City Hall during the annual sheep parade through Madrid, Spain, October 20, 2019. (Reuters/Sergio Perez)
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Livestock are driven through the streets of central Madrid, Spain, Sunday, Oct. 20, 2019. (AP/Paul White)
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A police officer speaks on her radio as a flock of sheep pass through central Madrid, Spain, Sunday, Oct. 20, 2019. (AP/Paul White)
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Flocks of sheep and goats are herded in the city center of Madrid on October 20, 2019. (AFP/Oscar del Pozo)
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A man stands behind fences as a flock of sheep walks past during the annual sheep parade through Madrid, Spain, October 20, 2019. (Reuters/Sergio Perez)
Updated 20 October 2019

Sheep take over streets of Madrid for annual migration

  • The annual event, which started in 1994, allows shepherds to exercise their right to use traditional routes to migrate their livestock
  • The herd includes 2,000 merino sheep and 100 goats

MADRID: Sheep replaced traffic on the streets of Madrid on Sunday as shepherds steered their flocks through the heart of the Spanish capital, following ancient migration routes.
The annual event, which started in 1994, allows shepherds to exercise their right to use traditional routes to migrate their livestock from northern Spain to more southerly pastures for winter grazing.
The route would have taken them through undeveloped countryside a few centuries ago, but today it cuts through Madrid’s bustling city center and along some of its most famous streets.
Sheep farmers pay a nominal charge in symbolic acknowledgement of a 1418 agreement with the city council that set a fee of 50 maravedis — medieval coins — per 1,000 sheep brought through the central Sol square and Gran Via street.
The herd includes 2,000 merino sheep and 100 goats.


Mumbai DJ swaps deck for doctor’s scrubs to fight coronavirus

Updated 28 May 2020

Mumbai DJ swaps deck for doctor’s scrubs to fight coronavirus

  • DJ Sanjay Meriya, known as The Spindoctor in Mumbai music circles, began work last month as a medical volunteer

MUMBAI: As India’s financial capital Mumbai battled a growing number of coronavirus cases, local DJ Sanjay Meriya set aside his turntable and dusted off a long-unused medical degree in order to help out.
Meriya, 30, known as The Spindoctor in Mumbai music circles, began work last month as a medical volunteer after spotting a government newspaper ad asking for help.
He has chiefly been visiting a slum in one of Mumbai’s worst-hit suburbs, clad in a protective suit and gloves, to instruct local residents about the precautions they should take to ward off the coronavirus.
“I’m very patriotic. I can battle this way (as a doctor),” Meriya, who signed up as a volunteer for at least three months, told Reuters.
Mumbai accounts for more than 32,000 of India’s 150,000 cases of the coronavirus, making it the worst-hit city. With government hospitals short of beds and health officials overworked, volunteers like Meriya are all the more important.
Meriya began to dabble in DJing as a hobby at around the age of 20 while studying for his medical degree, but said it then “took over me” — much to his family’s dismay.
“They hated it. They still hate it,” he said of his decision to devote himself to being a DJ.
Although worried about his potential exposure to the virus, Meriya’s family is thrilled to see him back in medicine.
“They now have a lot to share with all our relatives, if you know what I mean when it comes to Indian families,” he said.