Doors of Kabah opened for PM Khan as he performs Ummrah

Pakistan Prime Minister Imran Khan performed Umrah along with first lady in Makkah on September 20, 2019. (PM Office)
Updated 20 September 2019

Doors of Kabah opened for PM Khan as he performs Ummrah

  • Pakistani premier performed Umrah along with first lady and members of his delegation
  • In meeting with Saudi leadership, Khan strongly condemned the recent attacks on Saudi oil facilities

ISLAMABAD: Pakistan Prime Minister Imran Khan performed Umrah along with the first lady in Makkah on Thursday during his two-day trip to Saudi Arabia.
“The doors of Kabah were also opened for Prime Minister Imran Khan and for his delegation,” the PM Office said in a statement.




Prime Minister Khan is seen exiting the holy Kaaba after performing Umrah on September 20, 2019. (PM Office)

Khan was also accompanied by the foreign minister Shah Mahmood Qureshi, Adviser on Finance Hafeez Sheikh and special aide for overseas Pakistanis Zulfiqar Bukhari.
Pakistani Prime Minister was warmly received by Prince Faisal bin Salman bin Abdulaziz, Governor of Makkah, upon arrival at Prince Mohammed bin Abdulaziz International Airport.
Khan also held meetings with King Salman bin Abdulaziz of Saudi Arabia and Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman on bilateral ties.
During the meetings with Saudi leadership, Pakistani premier strongly condemned the attacks on Saudi Aramco oil facilities and reiterated Pakistan’s full support and solidarity with the brotherly Kingdom of Saudi Arabia against any threat to its security and territorial integrity.


Government hopeful to avert opposition protest through dialogue

Updated 18 min 24 sec ago

Government hopeful to avert opposition protest through dialogue

  • Says it’s opposition’s right to protest, but the government won’t allow anyone to create chaos
  • Analysts maintain the JUI-F chief has acquired political relevance by mounting pressure on the government

ISLAMABAD: The government has started contacting opposition parties to dissuade them from launching a mass protest in the federal capital, said defense minister Pervez Khattak on Thursday.
“We have started negotiating with all opposition parties and hopefully [the effort] will yield positive results in the next couple of days,” he said in an informal chat with journalists in Islamabad.
The prime minister on Wednesday announced to form a committee led by Khattak to hold talks with the opposition factions, especially the Jamiat-e-Ulema-e-Islam (JUI-F) that has announced to start its “Azadi March” on October 27 and enter the federal capital on October 31 to dislodge the government.
JUI-F Chief Maulana Fazlur Rehman has been struggling to start an agitation against the government since the general elections in July last year wherein his party only managed to clinch a dozen seats in the National Assembly.
He has now received political support from other major opposition groups – the Pakistan Muslim League-Nawaz (PML-N) and Pakistan Peoples Party (PPP) – who accuse the government of deteriorating the country’s economy and victimizing opposition politicians by slamming them in jails on corruption charges.
“Pakistan is a democratic country and we want to resolve all issues of the opposition through dialogue,” the defense minister said, though he also warned the opposition parties against creating an environment of chaos and turmoil in the country.
“It is their [opposition’s] democratic right to protest, but if the opposition only wants to spread anarchy in the garb of agitation we won’t allow it,” Khattak added.
Meanwhile, the JUI-F has ruled out the possibility of talks with the government until the prime minister resigns from his position. “This is an illegitimate government, a product of rigged elections and we may talk to them only after the prime minister resigns,” Hafiz Hamdullah, senior JUI-F leader, told Arab News.
He said that “all preparations for the anti-government march are in place and no force can stop us now from marching toward Islamabad.”
Political analysts said the government’s engagement with the opposition parties to stop their protest at this stage would not yield result, but some differences over issues, such as transparency in elections and improvement in governance, can be worked out.
“Maulana Fazlur Rehman, who was reduced to a nobody after the last year’s elections, has succeeded in garnering political relevance through mounting pressure against the government,” Zahid Hussain, a political commentator, told Arab News.
He said the opposition parties would protest against the government as per plan, but “they will neither succeed in getting the prime minister’s resignation nor a new date for fresh polls in the country.”