Britain’s Thomas Cook scrambles for $250m to avert collapse

Lenders are demanding another £200 million in underwritten funds to support Thomas Cook in its winter trading period. (Reuters)
Updated 20 September 2019

Britain’s Thomas Cook scrambles for $250m to avert collapse

  • Thomas Cook employs 21,000 people across 16 countries
  • Lenders are demanding another £200 million in underwritten funds to support Thomas Cook in its winter trading period

LONDON: Britain’s Thomas Cook scrambled on Friday to find an extra $251 million (£200 million) to satisfy its lenders and secure the survival of the world’s oldest holiday company.
Last month Thomas Cook, the pioneer of the package tour, agreed key terms of a £900 million recapitalization plan with Chinese shareholder Fosun and its banks.
Thomas Cook, which employs 21,000 people across 16 countries, warned on Friday that this could mean shareholders losing all of their investment.
“The recapitalization is expected to result in existing shareholders’ interests being significantly diluted, with significant risk of no recovery,” Thomas Cook said.
Lenders are demanding another £200 million in underwritten funds to support Thomas Cook in its winter trading period, when its cash is usually at a low ebb.
“Discussions to agree final terms on the recapitalization and reorganization of the company are continuing between the company and a range of stakeholders,” Thomas Cook said.
“These discussions include a recent request for a seasonal standby facility of £200 million, on top of the previously announced 900 million pounds injection of new capital.”
Thomas Cook, which has around 600,000 customers on holiday in Europe, has struggled with competition in popular destinations, high debt levels and an unusually hot summer in 2018 which reduced last-minute bookings.
A source close to the discussions said on Thursday that Royal Bank of Scotland (RBS) had hit Thomas Cook with a last-minute demand for the extra funding, adding that the situation “was becoming more critical.”
A spokesman for RBS said the bank did not “recognize this characterization of events” and was working with all parties to “try and find a resolution to the funding and liquidity shortfall at Thomas Cook.”
Under the original terms of the plan, Fosun — whose Chinese parent owns all-inclusive holiday firm Club Med — would contribute £450 million ($552 million) of new money in return for at least 75 percent of the tour operator business and 25 percent of the group’s airline.
Thomas Cook’s lending banks and bondholders were to stump up a further £450 million and convert their existing debt to equity, giving them in total about 75 percent of the airline and up to 25 percent in the tour operator business, the group said.
Thomas Cook said on Friday it would provide further updates “in due course.”


Oil prices fall but losses limited by Brexit deal hopes

Updated 20 min 40 sec ago

Oil prices fall but losses limited by Brexit deal hopes

  • US retail sales in September fell for the first time in seven months adding to economy fears

LONDON: Oil prices fell on Thursday as industry data showed a larger than expected increase in US inventories but losses were limited after Britain and the EU announced they had reached a deal on Brexit.

Global benchmark Brent crude was down 37 cents at $59.05 in afternoon London trade while US WTI crude was also down 37 cents, at $52.99.

US crude inventories soared by 10.5 million barrels to 432.5 million barrels in the week to Oct. 11, the American Petroleum Institute’s weekly report showed, ahead of official government stocks data.

Analysts had estimated US crude inventories rose by 2.8 million barrels last week.

“US sanctions imposed on Chinese shipping company COSCO are seriously denting demand for imported crude ... This has a profound impact on US crude oil inventories as reflected in last night’s API report,” said Tamas Varga, an analyst at PVM Oil Associates.

“US refinery maintenance is not helping to reverse the current trend and further builds in US crude oil inventories can be expected in the next few weeks.”

The US imposed sanctions on COSCO Shipping Tanker (Dalian) and subsidiary COSCO Shipping Tanker (Dalian) Seaman & Ship Management for allegedly carrying Iranian oil.

Adding to concerns about the global economy — and therefore oil demand — data from the US showed retail sales in September fell for the first time in seven months. Earlier data showed a moderation in job growth and services sector activity.

Nevertheless, Brexit developments helped limit oil’s decline. Prime Minister Boris Johnson said Britain and the EU had agreed a “great” new deal and urged lawmakers to approve it when they meet for a special session at the weekend.

Analysts have said any agreement that avoids a no-deal Brexit should boost economic growth and oil demand.

However, the Northern Irish party whose support Johnson needs to help ratify any agreement, has said that it refused to support the pact.

Hopes of a potential US-China trade deal also supported oil. The commerce ministry in Beijing said China hoped to reach a phased agreement with Washington as early as possible.

But the German government has lowered its 2020 forecast for economic growth to 1 percent from 1.5 percent, the economy ministry said. It said Germany, Europe’s largest economy, was not facing a crisis.