Exxon Mobil, Shell among groups to build 5 Pakistan LNG terminals

The logo of a Shell gas station is pictured in Ulm, Germany. The firm has concluded that a Nigerian oilfield sale where it suspects an executive took bribes was not linked to a separate court case. (Reuters/File Photo)
Updated 20 September 2019

Exxon Mobil, Shell among groups to build 5 Pakistan LNG terminals

  • Terminals could be in operation within two to three years
  • Pakistan is chronically short of gas for power production and to supply manufacturers

ISLAMABAD: Pakistan has approved the construction of five liquefied natural gas (LNG) terminals by groups that include Exxon Mobil Corp. and Royal Dutch Shell, aiming to triple imports and ease the country’s chronic gas shortage.
The five terminals could be in operation within two to three years, Omar Ayub Khan, Pakistan’s minister of power and petroleum, said in an interview on Friday.
Pakistan is chronically short of gas for power production and to supply manufacturers such as fertilizer makers, hobbling the country’s economy.
“It will make a significant dent in the gas shortage,” Khan said.
The groups Pakistan selected to build terminals are: Tabeer Energy, a unit of Mitsubishi Corp; Exxon and Energas; Trafigura Group and Pakistan GasPort; Shell and Engro Corp. ; and Gunvor Group and Fatima.
The identities of the five groups were reported earlier by Bloomberg.


Pakistan’s efforts for Afghan peace process lauded globally – FM Qureshi

Updated 39 min 50 sec ago

Pakistan’s efforts for Afghan peace process lauded globally – FM Qureshi

  • Details difficulties faced by Islamabad on the negotiations’ table
  • Says ball is in Kabul’s court now to end decades-old conflict in the country

ISLAMABAD: Pakistan’s Foreign Minister Shah Mahmood Qureshi said on Saturday that the US and the international community had commended Pakistan for its role in the Afghan peace process.

“It was difficult to bring the Taliban to the negotiating table; and to convince the world that the problems plaguing Afghanistan could not be resolved by the use of force,” Qureshi said, according to a statement released by the Foreign Office (FO) Saturday.

He added that Pakistan had to strive hard to push for the resumption of peace talks after US President Donald Trump abruptly called off the negotiations, in September last year, following the death of an American soldier in a Taliban-induced attack in Afghanistan.

“It is heartening to see that the US and the Taliban were finally close to signing a peace deal on February 29 after a substantial reduction in violence,” he said.

Qureshi said that during Zalmay Khalilzad’s recent visit to Pakistan, he had warned the US’ special envoy for Afghanistan about elements in the country who were benefiting from the prolonged conflict in Kabul.

In a separate conversation with US Secretary of State, Mike Pompeo, he had “emphasized on the need for the two countries to strengthen their relationship once again.”

Qureshi noted that ordinary Afghans were yearning for peace after nearly 19 years of war, adding that it was now up to the Afghan elite to work toward making that a reality.

“Either way, Pakistan has played its role in the Afghan peace and reconciliation process and it was now up to the Afghans how they want to deal with the situation,” he said.